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8erink

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Reply with quote  #76 
My daughter made the top 12 at the YAGP Finals in the precompetitive division. She does not look like a "skeleton". I would say she's pretty muscular for her age.
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pirouettemom

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Reply with quote  #77 
I think they are less strict about body type with pre competitives, and less strict for contemporary. It seems that most of those invited to NY finals are quite slim - though they seem the least strict with the precompetitives who qualify for finals just for contemporary.
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meatball77

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Reply with quote  #78 
It was the seniors that I noticed and often they were costumed during their contemporary pieces in a way that exaggerated their thinness and YAGP loves that.  I do get that there are kids who are naturally very thin and struggle to maintain a healthy weight during parts of their development (think Ava from Dancemoms although she's also very tall) and also kids who are naturally thin who can restrict themselves down to that body size fairly easily (but that doesn't mean that it's healthy or that those kids aren't getting injured). 
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5678StarMom

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Reply with quote  #79 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8erink
My daughter made the top 12 at the YAGP Finals in the precompetitive division. She does not look like a "skeleton". I would say she's pretty muscular for her age.


Congratulations!
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Phx115

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Reply with quote  #80 
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatball77
It was the seniors that I noticed and often they were costumed during their contemporary pieces in a way that exaggerated their thinness and YAGP loves that.  I do get that there are kids who are naturally very thin and struggle to maintain a healthy weight during parts of their development (think Ava from Dancemoms although she's also very tall) and also kids who are naturally thin who can restrict themselves down to that body size fairly easily (but that doesn't mean that it's healthy or that those kids aren't getting injured). 


We personally know Ava from pageants and her pre-Dance Moms phase. I'll suffice it to say she's a combination of genetics AND other things. She's doing a lot of runway modeling now, so her body type fits that world, too.
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ggsmith

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Reply with quote  #81 
I'm not saying there are no young dancers who are naturally so thin that their bones are visible at some point in their lives.  I'm not saying extremely thin bodies are inherently or always unhealthy.  My point is that YAGP rewards the very thin body type, with few or no exceptions.    

Meatball's observation clears up some confusion on my part about why certain costumes were chosen that I thought were not flattering.  

I don't consider anyone's children "fodder."  I am not from a ballet background and found the body focus and standards surprising.

Edited to add:  I've always had a mental picture of a ballet dancer as a slim, long-legged creature.  I was surprised at how very slim the dancers seem as "having potential" really are.  

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Phx115

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Reply with quote  #82 
Frankly, I find it odd, and almost defensive, that some members on here are taking YAGP/ballet world observations personally. Clearly, what some consider skeletal, others do not. If you put details about your child's weight, etc., that's your choice.

I pulled the link down but, TO ME, there is clearly a difference between the two dancers in that picture: one is thin and one is skeletal. Whether it is genetics, a growth spurt, restricting, an ED, male/female, ballet, gymnastics, or any activity ... it is what it is. The ballet world, in some instances, rewards it. I get that.

As I said in an earlier post, this isn't personal. However, an emaciated dancer is distracting to me. FOR ME, the dancer's weight becomes the focus, rather than the performance.

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pirouettemom

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Reply with quote  #83 
Yes I agree this thread has taken some odd detours. Super skinny, non-dancing sons and that some posters used to be very thin with quick metabolisms doesn't seem relevant. Yes, obviously there are naturally skinny people in the world - and that includes dancers. But ballet is a visual art - and if the body is distracting (whether too bony or large bulging muscles), it can take away from the actual performance. I have noticed some of the juniors faces are so lean that their eye sockets seem to be bulging out and they have prominent eye bags. Whether or not this is natural - it doesn't seem that normal for a 12-13 year old.
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dancingpeanut

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Reply with quote  #84 
Here's the thing, if I came on here saying how surprised I was to see some chubby dancers make the finals of any competition, I would be absolutely blasted and people would be raving about how great it is that the dance world is finally opening up to all body types. And I would be called horrible names for body shaming by using the word chubby. And I would not do that, I think it would be inappropriate to comment on the body type of young girls whose bodies are still developing engaging in an activity they love. But it seems ok to discuss the thinner dancers, with repeated use of the word "skeletal" and even posting pictures of adolescent dancers to prove the point. I find that equally inappropriate. As the mother of a very healthy dancer who has been described as bony, skeletal, anorexic, etc. to the point of needing therapy to overcome self esteem issues for the incessant comments (completely outside of the dance world, primarily from classmates, teachers and even strangers on the street), I am very sensitive to this issue. Sure, the ballet world, including YAGP traditionally favors thinner dancers, but speculating on the health of the finalists because of how they look seems to cross the line of general discussion about that issue and gets personal and is a matter between them, their parents, and their doctor. And I can tell you as my daughter approaches adulthood, those young adolescents with knobby knees and ribs sticking out can beautifully transform into lithe bodies with muscles of steel.
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tappinmom

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Reply with quote  #85 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phx115
Frankly, I find it odd, and almost defensive, that some members on here are taking YAGP/ballet world observations personally. Clearly, what some consider skeletal, others do not. If you put details about your child's weight, etc., that's your choice. I pulled the link down but, TO ME, there is clearly a difference between the two dancers in that picture: one is thin and one is skeletal. Whether it is genetics, a growth spurt, restricting, an ED, male/female, ballet, gymnastics, or any activity ... it is what it is. The ballet world, in some instances, rewards it. I get that. As I said in an earlier post, this isn't personal. However, an emaciated dancer is distracting to me. FOR ME, the dancer's weight becomes the focus, rather than the performance.


After all these years you should know that these threads do tend to branch off organically.  I'm sorry if mentioning my DS (who was a dancer) offended your sensibilities and in your mind didn't belong in this thread.
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classydance

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Reply with quote  #86 
I think it's the term "skeletal" that kind of rubs people the wrong way.  For me, it is not a very flattering term. 


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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #87 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pirouettemom
Yes I agree this thread has taken some odd detours. Super skinny, non-dancing sons and that some posters used to be very thin with quick metabolisms doesn't seem relevant. Yes, obviously there are naturally skinny people in the world - and that includes dancers. But ballet is a visual art - and if the body is distracting (whether too bony or large bulging muscles), it can take away from the actual performance. I have noticed some of the juniors faces are so lean that their eye sockets seem to be bulging out and they have prominent eye bags. Whether or not this is natural - it doesn't seem that normal for a 12-13 year old.


I suspect it took such a turn because some were interpreting the "observation" as more of a criticism. As if the OP was suggesting the judges were rewarding it and believed that that was not right. But if a young dancer's frame "is what it is"... maybe it isn't a matter of rewarding it but rather not penalizing these young dancers for something that might be out of their control.

I can't speak for anyone else but my comment was certainly not coming from a place of defense.  I was simply pointing out something that I thought perhaps Phx hadn't considered.

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