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prancer

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Reply with quote  #26 
I have been pouring through modern videos.  I definitely see the codification of certain moves associated with specific modern styles, e.g. Graham or Horton.  I'm willing to go out on a limb and say that the moves that come from these specific modern styles are regularly seen in a grounded, quality of movement focused contemporary dance.  I think that a student well-trained in ballet and contemporary would be able to transition to modern without much struggle.  This was my dd's experience in a modern showcase, but I would love to hear more.

Has anyone done enough of both to address the question of what transfers from contemporary to modern.  I suspect the better question is what transfers from modern to contemporary, but thinking of the ubiquitous nature of "contemporary" dance today, could a strong contemporary dancer adapt to specifically modern classes relatively well?
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tiptoemom

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Reply with quote  #27 
my daughter's teachers told me she transitioned to modern and jazz because of her ballet training. Those are actual classes she takes. Ballet/point, modern and jazz. On Sundays she has a 5 hour rehearsal. They learn pieces for different performance opportunities. The rehearsal is built and based on the company (her AD is the second member of the company and has been with them since its inception in 1991). The rehearsal work is a fusion of all of the training that they do. Does that make sense? Her friend and younger sister auditioned for the youth ensemble and made it after committing to train at the school all summer. They are solid dancers (both attend the Performing arts high school with daughter) but their training was at a competition studio and they had to unlearn some of bad habits and learn how this professional company trains and what they value. They are a great asset to the ensemble. So I guess that's my experience for you!
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nyklane

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Reply with quote  #28 
Lots of stuff to read now!  Thanks!
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prancer

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Reply with quote  #29 
Thank you all so much for participating in this thread with me. Because of your responses, I have figured out why I was feeling so confused. My daughter’s interests are aligning more with serious ballet training. I spoke with my daughter and she wants to increase her pointe training, she knew that before I asked her. I am so glad you helped us verbalize that desire before we missed the window.
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threegirlpileup

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Reply with quote  #30 
I asked my dancer daughter about the "modern" vs. "contemporary" and she said that modern seems to be especially applied to specific genres, such as Limon or Horton or Graham.  That being said, I definitely see the terms being used somewhat interchangeably--my dd went to an intensive this summer, and the classes she took were called "modern" and "modern repertory" and were not specific to a genre--and were not markedly different than the "contemporary" classes she takes at her home studio (taught by and Ailey-trained instructor).
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