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SortaReluctant1

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Reply with quote  #51 
Some colleges require tap at the audition. At the Pace callbacks, they told the kids it was optional. None of the people who sat out of tap were accepted. How do I know? The audition group had a lot of wait time and they connecdted on instagram. One dancer was "youtube famous" and an amazing dancer. She did not get in and DD thinks it had to have been because of tap.
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bisous3

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Reply with quote  #52 
Yes, I will echo what SortaReluctant said- my student at Pace tapped at her audition. Also, if your daughter has aspirations of dancing on Broadway one day, many shows have tap in them now!
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JojosDanceMom

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Reply with quote  #53 
I feel like tap is a pretty important piece of the Pace auditions.  My DD got accepted into Pace with a substantial scholarship without tap, BUT, that was through the NYCDA collage scholarship auditions at nationals.  They don't do tap for those, and Pace offers quite a few scholarships through those auditions.  That said, had DD had to audition at Pace through their normal auditions that would have been the only one that had tap included.  I agree that tap would also be important for a dancer interested in Broadway as well.  NYCDA nationals is holding an audition for Cats that requires ballet, jazz, and tap... with acro being a plus.  So for Broadway aspirations all styles are important.
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my2miracles

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Reply with quote  #54 
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatball77

“You know. Life's short. If you don't try new things, you'll never know what you're best at. And you can only make time for new things by quitting the things you know don't work for you.”
-- Meg Cabot



This is exactly how I feel.  My ds10 is very athletic and very capable in sports.  He loved t-ball until it was coach pitch and became competitive.  He's not competitive and sensitive.  He didn't like to be yelled at by coaches, other parents and kids.  I let him quite a couple of games before the season ended.  No sense in being miserable.  Fast forward a few years, his friends wanted him to play soccer.  He tried it - again not his thing.  I let him quit mid season.  No sense in torturing him and us.  He's now doing archery and loving it!

I was taught to stick things out.  I can't tell you how much of my 50 year life was wasted on doing things I hated and was miserable at - jobs, boyfriends/1st husband etc.  Life is too short to be miserable  We can't control everything but recreational activities are sure one of them!
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Ellie'sMom

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Reply with quote  #55 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2dancinboyngirl
As long as she isn't interested in performing on Broadway, I would say it isn't an issue. Tap is one of those differentiators they use when casting for most musicals, so it helps to have the basics down. This is not just my own idea, rather something a New York based professional dancer/singer/actor told me while we were both taking a Beginner Tap class at the Broadway Dance Center. He was taking the class to build up his skills as he was finding himself not getting call backs due to his lack of tap ability.


This. I feel like Broadway seems to be showcasing tappers more than they had 5-10 years ago. This trend could change, but think about all the classic tap shows and how revivals come and go (42nd st, Anything Goes, Millie, etc). These opportunities may also come up in college productions (my DD is not in college yet, but 2 of the shows I mentioned came around in local productions, and she didn't even try for them because she isn't a tapper, so unless you are the LEAD in 42nd st, you will be tapping!). College auditions are in a year and a half, and even though she will not likely need to tap for an audition, I believe it will help enhance her portfolio and expertise, overall.  

We have been going to Broadway Dance, taking random classes. This is a great place to be a beginner at an older age. There are all ages and all levels there (we saw the brother in Fun Home taking a beginner class there one day).  I go with my dd (I am a former dancer, enjoying the workouts and feeling like a kid again (albeit older, fatter and less flexible). She has come to the realization that she should not have given up dance for the few years that she did (when she became serious about acting and singing). While I don't regret letting her quit, I wish there would have been a way to keep her interested in staying in. She is currently surrounded by kids (in both HS and her local theatre groups) who are really good dancers, and really aspires to improve. 

As an aside, I am surprised at how many kids do not like tap [frown]  As a kid/teen, I trained at a studio that was very tap-heavy. It was what I loved the most. I am not surprised to hear this, as I see this on the reality shows, that tap is not highlighted. 
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Suzit42

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Reply with quote  #56 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmpmom


OMG ...THIS!!!  Of COURSE we force our kids to do things they "hate" because usually that "hatred" is actually fear, or lack of confidence, or something similar that it's important they learn to work through.  I would say that the problem with the current generation of kids is their parents let them off the hook too easily.  They have no concept of persevering.  Of "gutting it out".  Of "sucking it up".  Of figuring their way through something that is not easy for them.  

I'm not saying this to mean that your child HAS to stick it out in tap.  But take it as a learning opportunity to explain that "hate" should be reserved for things like terrorism and cruelty, not for a dance style that you don't like.  Suck it up to the end of the year and then bow out.  But don't "hate".  


Yes!!!

When my kids are afraid to do something new, that I know they would love doing, or when they want to give up on something that they loved in the past, it usually has something to do with fear of something new, fear of being alone, fear of giving up free time. Sometimes they need a nudge. DD17 went through an "I hate ballet" phase. A year later, she was back in love
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my2miracles

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Reply with quote  #57 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellie'sMom


This. I feel like Broadway seems to be showcasing tappers more than they had 5-10 years ago. This trend could change, but think about all the classic tap shows and how revivals come and go (42nd st, Anything Goes, Millie, etc). These opportunities may also come up in college productions (my DD is not in college yet, but 2 of the shows I mentioned came around in local productions, and she didn't even try for them because she isn't a tapper, so unless you are the LEAD in 42nd st, you will be tapping!). College auditions are in a year and a half, and even though she will not likely need to tap for an audition, I believe it will help enhance her portfolio and expertise, overall.  

We have been going to Broadway Dance, taking random classes. This is a great place to be a beginner at an older age. There are all ages and all levels there (we saw the brother in Fun Home taking a beginner class there one day).  I go with my dd (I am a former dancer, enjoying the workouts and feeling like a kid again (albeit older, fatter and less flexible). She has come to the realization that she should not have given up dance for the few years that she did (when she became serious about acting and singing). While I don't regret letting her quit, I wish there would have been a way to keep her interested in staying in. She is currently surrounded by kids (in both HS and her local theatre groups) who are really good dancers, and really aspires to improve. 

As an aside, I am surprised at how many kids do not like tap [frown]  As a kid/teen, I trained at a studio that was very tap-heavy. It was what I loved the most. I am not surprised to hear this, as I see this on the reality shows, that tap is not highlighted. 


For DD it isn't about it being showcased.  She's tapped for 8 years.  It's just her least favorite dance.  It's fast and different skillset from ballet which she loves.  Her previous studio was very, very, very, very heaving in tap. 
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lauraberney

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Reply with quote  #58 
I think you should have a detailed talk with her. If she doesn’t like it, she can choose another style. Get to know her views and opinions and consult the trainer or dance school for a good solution that will work out for her.
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mamaw

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Reply with quote  #59 
Tap is unlike all of the other disciplines.  Like hip hop, it is rather specialized and separate in skill and delivery.  Having said that, I feel that it is enormously valuable to a well rounded dance education.  It is true, that most colleges and universities don't require it for auditions, in the world of professional dance in musical theatre, it is one of the most important.  

If your dancer plans to be in a professional dance company, unless it is specifically a tap company, it is not needed.  If they plan to be on Broadway (assuming they sing) or a Rockette , then it is imperative.  

I think that it is wise for a child to at least give it a try and have it as a basic fundamental.  If the student wishes to stop after a year or two, then they should be allowed to.  It will not really make a difference to their contemporary dances or jazz or ballet...(though tap does strengthen feet and ankles which is very helpful in ballet and being strong and flexible enough for pointe).  

Tap is hard.  You cannot fake tap.  It is like a drum solo.  When done well, it is amazing, but when it is not, it is horrible noise. The rather unfortunate part of tap is that  is rarely scores high even when executed perfectly and danced with great enjoyment and entertainment.  

There are exceptions, and, in fact, my youngest daughter scored some of her highest scores with tap.  Now, as a dance teacher, it serves her very, very well because she is one of the few who can teach it at her two studios where she is employed.  Others can do it at rudimentary levels, but she has the advantage of being able to teach the higher levels, so if your child wishes to teach dance, it is good to have it in their pocket for sure.
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Twinkletoesx2

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Reply with quote  #60 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamaw
Tap is unlike all of the other disciplines.  Like hip hop, it is rather specialized and separate in skill and delivery.  Having said that, I feel that it is enormously valuable to a well rounded dance education.  It is true, that most colleges and universities don't require it for auditions, in the world of professional dance in musical theatre, it is one of the most important.  

If your dancer plans to be in a professional dance company, unless it is specifically a tap company, it is not needed.  If they plan to be on Broadway (assuming they sing) or a Rockette , then it is imperative.  

I think that it is wise for a child to at least give it a try and have it as a basic fundamental.  If the student wishes to stop after a year or two, then they should be allowed to.  It will not really make a difference to their contemporary dances or jazz or ballet...(though tap does strengthen feet and ankles which is very helpful in ballet and being strong and flexible enough for pointe).  

Tap is hard.  You cannot fake tap.  It is like a drum solo.  When done well, it is amazing, but when it is not, it is horrible noise. The rather unfortunate part of tap is that  is rarely scores high even when executed perfectly and danced with great enjoyment and entertainment.  

There are exceptions, and, in fact, my youngest daughter scored some of her highest scores with tap.  Now, as a dance teacher, it serves her very, very well because she is one of the few who can teach it at her two studios where she is employed.  Others can do it at rudimentary levels, but she has the advantage of being able to teach the higher levels, so if your child wishes to teach dance, it is good to have it in their pocket for sure.


Just curious where you are from. I am from the tri state area and we'll done tap scores very well here.
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heromom

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Reply with quote  #61 
I think it depends on her long term goals. My DS graduated from AMDA LA. He does tap but didn't have to for the audition. He was required to take tap. He is pursuing a career in commercial dance and being able to do multiple styles including tap is very beneficial.
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