Register Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 3      1   2   3   Next
momofdanceobsessed

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 213
Reply with quote  #1 
My dancer is 14 and she finished her first year of tap this year. She HATES tap. It was a struggle to get her to even go to class. She excels in other genres and has placed in the overalls multiple times this season with her solo. That said her goal is to be accepted into a college dance program. Is it necessary that she continue in tap if her focus is contemporary and of course extensive ballet training? I know it would make her more well rounded and help with musicality and retention. She knows that too and that was why she decided to take it this year. But since she wasn't moved up a level and is separated from people her age and her friends that isn't helping her to like it anymore. I don't know if the benefits are worth the battle. Thoughts?
0
My2DanceLoves

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 5,410
Reply with quote  #2 
DD18 never had to perform tap for a college audition.  

I don't know why any dancer would take any classes they "hate". 
0
mom2rb

Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 84
Reply with quote  #3 
DS never had tap during an audition. He does have to take one semester of tap to graduate.
0
momofdanceobsessed

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 213
Reply with quote  #4 
She took it because she felt there was benefits of taking it and wanted to give it a try. And she wanted to finish what she started. But I say the benefits aren't worth the misery to continue. I think she is a pretty solid no unless she feels it could be detrimental to a college audition.
0
joriebelle

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,314
Reply with quote  #5 
Honestly, if she hates it don't make her do it.  She won't get anything out of it if she doesn't want to be there.  That being said, tap has many benefits, such as learning rhythm, syncopation and musicality.  Makes your ankles strong too.  [smile]
0
rdsmom

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,473
Reply with quote  #6 
Honestly, I hate it when tap is required (for competition teams). Many of our dancers don't like it, and therefore don't try very hard. SO believes tap is important for rhythm and musicality, so she requires it. My kids love it, so I'm biased. [smile]
0
My2DanceLoves

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 5,410
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by momofdanceobsessed
She took it because she felt there was benefits of taking it and wanted to give it a try. And she wanted to finish what she started. But I say the benefits aren't worth the misery to continue. I think she is a pretty solid no unless she feels it could be detrimental to a college audition.
 


I wasn't questioning why she took it in the first place.    Just don't see why she would continue if she hates it. 
0
momofdanceobsessed

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 213
Reply with quote  #8 
I think she is conflicted by the original reasons she took it. She knows there is benefits to taking it. But I think I am going to reassure her that she is fine without it. Sounds like it isn't super important for college. And she gained the basics this year.
0
dancermom128

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,609
Reply with quote  #9 
I know lots of dancers that don't tap at all who got into top college programs this year. I only know of one dancer who had to do tap in an audition (Dean College). If she can bear it I do think it's great for musicality. My own DD only does tap at conventions now and I'm not worried that it will hold her back.
0
tendumom

Avatar / Picture

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,053
Reply with quote  #10 
There are actually different styles of tap. When dd was younger, she did not like tap very much at all. We used to call her "the anti-tapper." She tolerated it. When she returned to it in drop in classes at age 17, she had a blast. But, if your dd is not having fun with the tap classes at your studio, I'd let it go. Dd has friends at schools like Fordham-Ailey and Marymount and not one of them taps. She has two friends in the Fordham program who probably never took a single tap class in their lives. They grew up at ballet schools. I think she'll be fine and she now should have the basics in case she needs it in the future.
0
Jacaranda

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,093
Reply with quote  #11 
Is it possible she just hated it because she found it difficult. It isn't easy to take up tap as a teenager when I assume most of the kids have been doing it since they are very little.

I think tap is important for a theatrical dancer for a few reasons.
1. It teaches rhythm and musicality in a way that other dance styles don't
2. It develops very fast thinking skills, which improve ability to remember choreography
3. It is used a lot on musical theatre if kids want to work on that area
4. It opens doors for the kids, if you go to auditions it is tough to get the job, when they sau "who can tap". And she can it opens doors.
0
kmpmom

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,098
Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacaranda
Is it possible she just hated it because she found it difficult. It isn't easy to take up tap as a teenager when I assume most of the kids have been doing it since they are very little. I think tap is important for a theatrical dancer for a few reasons. 1. It teaches rhythm and musicality in a way that other dance styles don't 2. It develops very fast thinking skills, which improve ability to remember choreography 3. It is used a lot on musical theatre if kids want to work on that area 4. It opens doors for the kids, if you go to auditions it is tough to get the job, when they sau "who can tap". And she can it opens doors.


A second hand story but one of DD's teammates was at a large audition last year and they'd narrowed it to about 25 dancers but could only take 10 ..or something like that.  So they said, "who can tap?"  Roughly 15 of them stepped forward.  Everyone else was dismissed.  After proving they could tap, they were asked, "which of you can sing and dance?" (they weren't looking for lead vocals but someone who knew the breathing requirements and had experience at Song & Dance.)  DD's teammate and only 3 others stepped forward.  They all got automatic acceptance.  Who knows if the dismissed dancers could sing?  We'll never know because they couldn't tap and that's what was asked for first.

You never know when you might need it.  Find a different program and give a short course a whirl.  It may be the way she's being taught.

(btw, I would agree tap would be much harder to take on when you're older)
0
momofdanceobsessed

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 213
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacaranda
Is it possible she just hated it because she found it difficult. It isn't easy to take up tap as a teenager when I assume most of the kids have been doing it since they are very little.

I think tap is important for a theatrical dancer for a few reasons.
1. It teaches rhythm and musicality in a way that other dance styles don't
2. It develops very fast thinking skills, which improve ability to remember choreography
3. It is used a lot on musical theatre if kids want to work on that area
4. It opens doors for the kids, if you go to auditions it is tough to get the job, when they sau "who can tap". And she can it opens doors.


This☝ I completely agree and here is where her conflict lies. And whoever said that it is harder when older YES!!! She is a very hard worker and doesn't have to know people or be in with friends to take a class BUT when you don't like the genre and then you are in with people you don't know and your friends have been tapping for 8 years...well it doesn't make it more fun. But her catching up to be in a level with friends will take years. There may be 9 yr holds in her class next year...I am thinking that is a no go
0
joriebelle

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,314
Reply with quote  #14 
I agree. . . if she was younger I would say go for it, but since she doesn't like it anyway I wouldn't do it.
0
mom2dancinboyngirl

Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 275
Reply with quote  #15 
As long as she isn't interested in performing on Broadway, I would say it isn't an issue. Tap is one of those differentiators they use when casting for most musicals, so it helps to have the basics down. This is not just my own idea, rather something a New York based professional dancer/singer/actor told me while we were both taking a Beginner Tap class at the Broadway Dance Center. He was taking the class to build up his skills as he was finding himself not getting call backs due to his lack of tap ability.
0
heidi459

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 5,815
Reply with quote  #16 
IDK  I keep coming back to your comment that she "hates" it.  And that she is a teen.  If she were just starting out I would definitely encourage her to try to push through a little just to get a foundation but at this stage of the game?  Even if it does make her more well rounded.  Even if it "could" open doors.  Does she really want to open doors to an opportunity where she would be required to do something she hates? 

My own dd had an audition this past weekend where, at one point, they asked those dancers who had acro skills to do their stuff.  About half the kids tumbled on.  My dd, of course, was amongst the half who had nothing to show.  After we were talking & I asked her if she wished she had something.  Her answer?  No. She doesn't like tricks, doesn't want to do tricks, & if tricks are required for some opportunity then that opportunity is simply not the opportunity for her.  To each their own but, in my opinion anyway... she's got it right.

eta: and fwiw.. that request for tricks was clearly just out of curiosity.  Because she wasn't cut after that round.
0
momofdanceobsessed

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 213
Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidi459
IDK  I keep coming back to your comment that she "hates" it.  And that she is a teen.  If she were just starting out I would definitely encourage someone to try it but at this stage of the game?  Even if it does make her more well rounded.  Even if it "could" open doors.  Does she really want to open doors to an opportunity where she would be required to do something she hates? 

My pwn dd had an audition this past weekend where, at one point they asked those dancers who had acro skills to do their stuff.  About half the kids tumbled on.  My dd, of course, was amongst the half who had nothing to show.  Later we were talking & I asked her if she wished she had something.  Her answer?  No. She doesn't like tricks. Doesn't want to do tricks.  And if tricks are required for some opportunity than that opportunity is simply not the opportunity for her.  To each their own but in my opinion anyway... she's got it right.


Very good point!
0
Suzit42

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,579
Reply with quote  #18 
Background, DD17 is a tapper. We are looking at colleges as a non dance major but she hopes to find a school with tap classes. Our research has found very few. In our small corner of the dance world, tap is an afterthought. If your DD truly hates it, then skip it. If it prevents her from getting a job, then it wasn't meant for her anyway. Focus on her loves instead.
0
jwsqrdplus2

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,890
Reply with quote  #19 
I would say that basic tap skills are somewhat important.  Tap (much like Writing in the SAT or ACT) can often be used as a tie-breaker.  I have heard multiple stories similar to what kmpmom and heidi have said.  Ash takes both tap (really would rather not) and tumbling (loves) at her studio.  Tap is required for all team dancers even if they do not compete it.  SOs consider it part of a well-rounded dance education, and I agree.  With Ash planning on pursuing dance as her future, knowing that she can raise her hand when a director asks "Who can tap?" makes the class worth it to both me and her.
0
dancemonkey

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,023
Reply with quote  #20 
My dd applied for college as a musical theater major. She is a tapper. Only one school had tap as part of their audition. At 14 if she's interested in improving in tap I'd get her privates. If it's not her thing I wouldn't worry about it!
0
Angel2228

Avatar / Picture

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 584
Reply with quote  #21 
I would try and narrow down the why she hates it. If it's because she's not with her friends, I would encourage her to try and look past the friendships and focus on the learning. If she feels like she's not good at it so she doesn't want to keep doing it, I would again encourage her to to stick with it and see where she can go with it and not worry about how fast everyone else can pick it up.
Tap is hard! I've tried to make the same sounds, very tough! Dd is naturally very good at tap. She has flexible feet/ankles and can make really nice clear sharp sounds. But she 'hates' it as well. She was put in a strong tap class but struggles with choreo. She's off in practice and throws off the whole group and doesn't like the pressure. She always gets it by comp, but last year she made herself ill thinking about messing up. It's not worth it. She also started pointe and wanted to strengthen her ankles for it. So she quit this year [frown] I'm trying to encourage her to go back next year to the lower class. Not looking good so far. Personally I am not a fan of tap, but the look on her face when she's tapping for fun is priceless. I want her to feel like that always. <3
0
DanceMomLaura

Avatar / Picture

Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 376
Reply with quote  #22 
My DD14 is giving up tap at the end of this season.  She took her last class this past Monday and will perform a group dance in 3 recital shows then she's done with it.  Not her thing anymore and she's trying to cut back where she can.  Tap got the axe.  I'm ok with that.  As others have said, given her age and the fact that she really doesn't enjoy it, why bother?  She has had enough years where she could probably hold her own in an audition ... but her plan isn't to dance after high school anyway.
0
gandalf

Avatar / Picture

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 909
Reply with quote  #23 
If we let our chuildren stop all activities they hate, they would lie around all day on their iPhone and snapchat. If that's how we are going to parent, then just give them a credit-card and tell them to have a great life
3
heidi459

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 5,815
Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gandalf
If we let our chuildren stop all activities they hate, they would lie around all day on their iPhone and snapchat. If that's how we are going to parent, then just give them a credit-card and tell them to have a great life


You lose.  My kid doesn't even have a phone [biggrin]

But, in all seriousness... fortunately my kid fills up her life with activities she enjoys.  I'm sorry to hear that your children have had such difficulty finding activities that bring them joy... so much so that they have been forced to fill up their lives with activities they hate or be forced to live the life of a couch potato. 



0
dancedaughters

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,670
Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gandalf
If we let our chuildren stop all activities they hate, they would lie around all day on their iPhone and snapchat. If that's how we are going to parent, then just give them a credit-card and tell them to have a great life


If I let my children stop all of the activities they hate, they'd be doing exactly what they are doing now.  DD1 does dance and musical theater and choral singing and theater tech and continues to attend her school art class even though she is now graduated and thus excused from all classes.  She also spends quite a bit of time playing some game on her phone.  DD2 dances and uses her free time to create art/craft projects that decorate her room, to make music videos using music.ly, to snapchat with her friends, play with her dog, and walk on her hands.  Other than finishing out commitments where other people depended on them, they've never had to continue with activities that they hate. It has not led to a life of sloth.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation: