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meatball77

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Reply with quote  #26 
Balanchine was a choreographer, it's not a dance methodology.  There are a lot of quirks with Balanchine style which are different than classical dancers, most of these are best left till a dancer has a strong technical foundation because some of the things aren't great for the developing body.  I don't think there are many (if any) studios that actually train their tiny dancers with the Balanchine quirks, I think it's generally something that's added once you get into advanced work. 
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Noel

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Reply with quote  #27 
All good to know, thank you Oatmella and meatball77 !
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tendumom

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Reply with quote  #28 

An interesting factoid I learned about the hands when dd switched to a Balanchine style school is that it's not so much a "claw" shape as those of us on the outside sometimes call it. It's about having energy that goes all the way out through the ends of the fingers. 

I don't even notice it in dd now, but I think she has developed a hand style somewhere in between that "claw" and the looser manner of holding the fingers. She moved to a Balanchine style school when she was 17. The style was very freeing for her after so many years of ABT. I probably mentioned it earlier, but there is also a very heavy dose of Vaganova in many schools that teach in this style. 



SAB does have a large program for young dancers now (used to start at 8, now at 6), but very few of them make it into the next divisions. 

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Noel

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Reply with quote  #29 
DD has tried a few studios in the last few weeks as we figured out where to go and she has said, "they just do the hands differently". It doesn't seem to be an issue yet. I wonder though, as they age, is that something they should be able to adapt to on the fly?
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tiptoemom

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Reply with quote  #30 
Balanchine choreography is about more than the hands. But, yes, any well trained classical ballet dancer should be able to pick up any choreography. A dancer should be able to be in an audition or rehearsal or ballet mistress and pick up what they want you to do. 
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Noel

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Reply with quote  #31 
Thank you for the insight, tiptoemom.
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mom2tall

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Reply with quote  #32 
DD was always told to learn a clean style early on - Russian, Cecchetti, ABT, English and learn Balanchine later since most rep performed by most companies is not exclusively Balanchine, other than NYCB.

I agree with others - it's the teachers that count most when choosing a style. DD has moved just fine between classic styles over the years as she switched studios.
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Noel

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Reply with quote  #33 
Thank you, mom2tall !
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tendumom

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Reply with quote  #34 
Laughing at the things that I had corrected out of me when I went back to adult classes at dd's school and the things that dd got as corrections when she started at a Balanchine school. Not using her head at barre was such a struggle after so many years of classical training. She can turn it off and on now, but it was a challenge to stop! 

The crossing she talks about is also common to a degree in Vaganova. When dd came home from Bolshoi, her ABT trained teacher was unhappy with the "over crossing." 

Great video!! 
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