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cynmckee

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Anyone have any experience they want to share?
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cynmckee

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Nothing?  Anyone got any stories of people they have heard go through the 10 session rolfing sessions?  Anything?  This was recommended to dd by a therapeutic masseuse who worked on her and thought it would give her a lot of relief.
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My2DanceLoves

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I have never heard of it.  Sorry. :/
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dancemonkaymom

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rolling on the floor laughing?
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ballerinamom13

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DD gets massages from the OBT staff.  I'm not sure what kind it is, but boy does it help.  I don't think she could do what she does without weekly or bi-weekly massages.
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kmpmom

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I've heard that ROLFing is totally amazing but it's really hard to come by as it requires very specific training.  Might be worth checking it out.  Painful though, but then again so is any type of deep tissue massage.
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Mom2Girls

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Sorry, Cynmckee, no personal experience with it. Sounds really interesting, though.


Quote:
Originally Posted by dancemonkaymom
rolling on the floor laughing?


I was actually kind of thinking it was a euphemism for vomiting until I realized that was "ralphing" and googled rolfing.


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dancemonkaymom

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So its a massage? LOL rofl[rofl]
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cynmckee

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We have a huge institute within 30 or 40 minutes from us.  http://www.rolf.org/

It seems like it would be beneficial to help dd because every time she goes for a massage they always comment that her muscles feel like cement and no matter how long she goes for, they seem like they wished they had more time to work on her.  Last itme she went, they lady suggested this.  I do know that it painful, but dd is a little bit of a masochist when it come to massages...only wants super deep tissue.  But my sister thought it was crazy because her friend did this and told my dd some story about them going up your nose and pressing on your sinus cavity...which flipped the girl out, of course.

Just wondering if anyone has gone through the series.
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cynmckee

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Not sure anyone will care, but thought I'd give an update just for someone in the future who will search this topic.

We are 2 sessions in and while dd sees some difference, it is subtle.  The therapist did a lot of examination in the first session it became clear that dd's hip issues are not going to be "fixed" here.  Upon examination, the therapist found that dd is engaging muscles that she shouldn't be engaging, even when doing simple movements.  It is a rehash of what the physical therapist was working on.  It made dd cry because she realized that there would be no "fix" for this other than her retraining herself how to move.  Problem is she can not feel the difference when she is engaging the right muscles vs. when she is engaging the wrong ones.  I think it is scary and disheartening for her...and I don't really know where to go from here.  Biofeedback to help her retrain her muscles?

The first session he worked on her breathing and core (ribcage, etc.) and dd said she felt better control of her breath in her SI afterward.  Second session he worked on her feet and calves.  One foot showed a lot of improvement (much higher releve) but the other one seems "stuck" and he said it looks like there was injury in that foot (which was true.)  He said we would go back to that one in future sessions.

Overall, I don't think it's as painful as we thought it would be but it definitely is uncomfortable sometimes.
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heidi459

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Is this pain that she experiences only during dance?  And if so, what are her long term goals?  Because if dance is only an extracurricular activity, IDK, I think if it were me I'd think twice before getting all involved in extensive/expensive therapy.  But that's just me.
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cynmckee

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Quote:
Originally Posted by heidi459
Is this pain that she experiences only during dance?  And if so, what are her long term goals?  Because if dance is only an extracurricular activity, IDK, I think if it were me I'd think twice before getting all involved in extensive/expensive therapy.  But that's just me.


She does want to dance professionally.  She's a smart kid (math, science etc) so she could do something else, but she says this is the only thing she has a true passion for.  I think that is why she broke down and sobbed.  The pain comes from overuse in performance situations, not day to day classes.  If a piece is very "leggy" (lots of battements) and they practice it over and over, her hips will hurt and sometimes lock.  And if she is using the wrong muscles to do those leggy movements instead of her core, I can see why that is happening.  They don't think her core is weak but that her brain is telling the wrong muscles to engage at the start of the movement.
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Dancemomjus

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I hope she starts to feel better and heal!
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jlm645

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It must be heartbreaking to watch her feel so sad. 

I'm curious what you are thinking with biofeedback- I have seen people use it to manage pain or stress with great results, but I haven't heard of it retraining muscles. 

I do always appreciate it when a professional can correctly recognize something I haven't told them, like the injury to one foot.  That feels reassuring to me.
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cynmckee

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlm645
It must be heartbreaking to watch her feel so sad. 

I'm curious what you are thinking with biofeedback- I have seen people use it to manage pain or stress with great results, but I haven't heard of it retraining muscles. 

I do always appreciate it when a professional can correctly recognize something I haven't told them, like the injury to one foot.  That feels reassuring to me.


Not sure really.  I am thinking they could hook opposing muscles up while she does the repetitive movement so that she got immediate feedback as to when she is using the correct muscles until she either can feel it or until the brain retrains itself.  This is kind of what happens at the PT office but that consists of the PT holding those muscles while she does those movements and dd becoming more and more frustrated because she can't feel the difference.  I thought if she could do this at home she would be able to work through the frustration.  These are deep psoas muscles.  But this is just me searching the internet and looking up biofeedback clinics.  I am not sure this is feasible until I talk to a clinic.  She is not in pain all the time by any means...it just rears it's head when she doing a bunch of performing.  Our goal was to get a handle on what is happening this summer.  The rolfing guy had her do a lot of visualization which seemed to help or at least had an effect.
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tendumom

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Can I ask how old she is?

I wonder if some of this, especially understanding and feeling what muscles she is using, will come with maturity?

I also wonder if a sports medicine PT would make a difference or a dance certified PT (I forget the proper term for the latter, my own PT was getting a certification in it). Dd is at an SI where they were all evaluated by physical therapists specializing in sports medicine from a large university. They evaluated all their strengths and weaknesses. Dd had a perfect score on core strength, something she has worked very hard on. The PT then gave her exercises and methods to make a standard mat Pilates class more challenging for her. They also worked with her on using her psoas and iliacus, two very deep muscles. I wish I knew the specifics but her occasional hip issues are actually due to a very tight iliacus. How they can separate that from the psoas, I'll never know! Anyway, my point is that they seem to be highly specialized and she's benefited greatly from their advice in a very short period of time.

If you are close enough to NYC or can schedule a little vacation of some sort there, the Harkness Institute would be the place to have her evaluated. They do offer a free basic injury prevention analysis for dancers. It might be worth consulting them. Dd has not been there yet, but from what friends have said, it sounds like her experience at her SI has been similar.
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cynmckee

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tendumom
Can I ask how old she is? I wonder if some of this, especially understanding and feeling what muscles she is using, will come with maturity? I also wonder if a sports medicine PT would make a difference or a dance certified PT (I forget the proper term for the latter, my own PT was getting a certification in it). Dd is at an SI where they were all evaluated by physical therapists specializing in sports medicine from a large university. They evaluated all their strengths and weaknesses. Dd had a perfect score on core strength, something she has worked very hard on. The PT then gave her exercises and methods to make a standard mat Pilates class more challenging for her. They also worked with her on using her psoas and iliacus, two very deep muscles. I wish I knew the specifics but her occasional hip issues are actually due to a very tight iliacus. How they can separate that from the psoas, I'll never know! Anyway, my point is that they seem to be highly specialized and she's benefited greatly from their advice in a very short period of time. If you are close enough to NYC or can schedule a little vacation of some sort there, the Harkness Institute would be the place to have her evaluated. They do offer a free basic injury prevention analysis for dancers. It might be worth consulting them. Dd has not been there yet, but from what friends have said, it sounds like her experience at her SI has been similar.


She is 15, so not super young.  I just think those muscles are so deep, it is hard to feel them and somewhere along the line (maybe there was an injury) her brain just started to say, "use these instead" as a way of protecting the sore ones?  We've been to a sports doctor, but although I found her very caring, she was definitely not a dance specialist.  She worked with soccer players mostly and was a little befuddled at dd's flexibility...which seemed weird to me at the time.  Our PT was a former ballerina (I forget where) and was awesome.  I am guessing we need to go back.  My ins will only pay for 10 sessions so we had to quit and while it helped...it didn't seem to really solve anything...just made us aware of the problem.  DD went to the chiropractor yesterday to get her hips adjusted and showed him the discrepancy in her back muscles and he said "Cheeses...that's weird!  We need to watch that."  He said one side almost looks swollen compared to the other but it's not...just more muscular.  He gave her some exercises to work on the weak side.  She has the same issue with her abs, but less pronounced.

We will be in NYC but not until next summer.  I think I am going to try and schedule an eval with them, especially if we can't get a handle on this now.
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tendumom

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Reply with quote  #18 
I am not sure how far in advance they book, but I do know that summer is prime time for them in NYC with the influx of SI dancers.

I had hoped to bring dd there, but never got around to it. I believe they will do an annual free evaluation.
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