Register Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
rdsmom

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,473
Reply with quote  #1 
Aaaargh!!!!! We went to Revel today. New convention / competition. DD competed her solo. It wasn't going well this year, so she revamped the concept/story in order to give the performance more meaning, and did some cool makeup and hair changes. We are used to competitions with 100 or more teen advanced solos, and this one only had 25. She's never made overalls for her solo, even though she has solid technique and fantastic performance and connection to the music. We thought she had a good chance today, but nothing. She got the second highest adjudication like always. We can say to ourselves over and over that it's about the critiques and performance opportunities, but when her friends are all continually placing and she doesn't, it's just so disappointing. I hate to think this, but she's not a contortionist and she won't extremely thin and long, and I think that's what is holding her back. Her flexibility is perfectly acceptable for dancers- but she's not double jointed and she can't bend in half backwards. She's 5'3, and has short muscular legs. And I know this may not make sense, but I'm just sad that her best isn't good enough and seems like it will never be. 😔
0
momcrew

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 508
Reply with quote  #2 
I could have written this post. 🙁 No words of advice, just know you're not alone in feeling that way.
0
heidi459

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 5,824
Reply with quote  #3 

Fwiw  my own experience over 5 yrs does not support the conclusion that you have come to.  Not at all.  So I guess I'll only offer this in the hope that it helps:  As great as it feels to place and as frustrating as it is to never place... there are always going to be many more dancers with solid technique and strong performance skills than there are awards.  

            

0
tendumom

Avatar / Picture

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,056
Reply with quote  #4 
First of all, competition results only matter at competitions. They mean nothing outside that individual comp on that day. It doesn't matter how she placed. If she continues past high school, the only value from all of this is her training and performance experience.

I've also read here repeatedly that the older they get, the less the tricks and bendy bunny over flexibility matters. Look at some of the top senior videos from comps like NYCDA. I think you will see a wider variety of bodies, all of whom move beautifully with exceptional technique.
0
duchessofdance

Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 312
Reply with quote  #5 
Could her technique be holding her back? Solid doesn't necessarily equal strong.
0
Julieg

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 146
Reply with quote  #6 
I don't know if you'd be interested in doing this but I see that Revel's livestream is still available from yesterday.  If you want, you could tell us her number, we could watch, and offer feedback.  I am not in any way a dance expert.  But, I know what I find entertaining and can spot an unpointed toe every once in a while.
0
dancemonkey

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,025
Reply with quote  #7 
I'm assuming she's a teen? We just went to Starpower and honestly everyone was pretty good. I felt there might have been some studio bias but that doesn't really matter. The question that you need to ask is what are her future goals? Because by the time she's a senior it won't matter if she placed!
0
hsealover

Avatar / Picture

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 195
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdsmom
Aaaargh!!!!! We went to Revel today. New convention / competition. DD competed her solo. It wasn't going well this year, so she revamped the concept/story in order to give the performance more meaning, and did some cool makeup and hair changes. We are used to competitions with 100 or more teen advanced solos, and this one only had 25. She's never made overalls for her solo, even though she has solid technique and fantastic performance and connection to the music. We thought she had a good chance today, but nothing. She got the second highest adjudication like always. We can say to ourselves over and over that it's about the critiques and performance opportunities, but when her friends are all continually placing and she doesn't, it's just so disappointing. I hate to think this, but she's not a contortionist and she won't extremely thin and long, and I think that's what is holding her back. Her flexibility is perfectly acceptable for dancers- but she's not double jointed and she can't bend in half backwards. She's 5'3, and has short muscular legs. And I know this may not make sense, but I'm just sad that her best isn't good enough and seems like it will never be. 😔


I totally get it, DD is on the chubby side, short, and muscular. Most of the time, the body attributes of your dancer won't affect the results. DD has been on all ends of the spectrum, receiving all the way from golds to platinum and from first overall to not placing at all(From the time she started competing to now). As frustrating as it can be sometimes, don't let it get to you. You should try not to care about the placement. That's a combination of three judges' opinions on one given day that could have been totally different on another day. Maybe your dancer had an off day. It happens. Maybe you should express to her that you don't care how she placed, that she went out there and did awesome and you're proud of her anyways. It takes a lot of courage to go out in front of a bunch of strangers and put everything you've worked for on the table for everyone to see. Tell her you're proud of her. She doesn't have to be "better" than all of the other talented dancers. The judges could have chosen a number of different outcomes on a different day. These are three total strangers' opinions combined on something that is totally subjective, does it matter? Because down the road, in the long run, how much will it really matter? Something you can do, is pump her up, tell her how awesome she is, encourage her, praise her, and cheer her on, this will help her succeed and feel more confident on stage. Help her utilize the critiques written on the score sheets and mentioned in the videos in a positive way and apply it to her dancing. Use it as a learning tool rather than a representation of how good of a dancer she is. This will eventually lead to her not caring so much about the awards, you should both work up to that. DD and I have found that the less you worry about placement, the better you will start to perform. All of the energy you are using worrying about her overalls could be spent helping her better herself and to make her performance even better! The less you care about the awards, the less she will, and the better you'll both feel.

Good luck to both of you!
0
dave9988

Avatar / Picture

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 574
Reply with quote  #9 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdsmom
Aaaargh!!!!! We went to Revel today. New convention / competition. DD competed her solo. It wasn't going well this year, so she revamped the concept/story in order to give the performance more meaning, and did some cool makeup and hair changes. We are used to competitions with 100 or more teen advanced solos, and this one only had 25. She's never made overalls for her solo, even though she has solid technique and fantastic performance and connection to the music. We thought she had a good chance today, but nothing. She got the second highest adjudication like always. We can say to ourselves over and over that it's about the critiques and performance opportunities, but when her friends are all continually placing and she doesn't, it's just so disappointing. I hate to think this, but she's not a contortionist and she won't extremely thin and long, and I think that's what is holding her back. Her flexibility is perfectly acceptable for dancers- but she's not double jointed and she can't bend in half backwards. She's 5'3, and has short muscular legs. And I know this may not make sense, but I'm just sad that her best isn't good enough and seems like it will never be. 😔


Do you get to see the score sheets or comments?  Looks like Revel scores technique as 50%, so fantastic performance & musicality can't overcome "solid" technique.  Maybe that was a poor word choice during a rant, but "solid" feels average/mediocre.  They also weight 20% on dynamics (which may actually be limited by the choreo).

Easier said than done, but we hear it said to dancers so often - chin up, focus on your own journey to improvement, don't worry so much about short term results or other dancer's paths.

Hang in there.

 

0
tiptoemom

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 184
Reply with quote  #10 
@rdsmom, I'm sorry that you feeling down about the competition. I'm not familiar with competitions and cannot offer any words of wisdom. I was wondering how old your daughter is and what her goals are. I'm sure that people could give great advice, if you'd like? Or, sometimes it is just cathartic to vent, and that's ok, too[smile]))
0
Dancingemu

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 154
Reply with quote  #11 
There are plenty of girls on the bigger, shorter, or otherwise awkwardly proportioned that get overalls at the competitions we've been to. Musicality seems to be the biggest factor and can cover some technical flaws. Flexibility doesn't matter against ones height or build. It takes some little training, others hours a day. (static and dynamic stretching) That said, flexibility shouldn't hold her back from the top. There's plenty that con be done choreography wise to cover for lack of flexibility. 
0
608Mom

Novice Member
Registered:
Posts: 4
Reply with quote  #12 
I also could have written this.  In fact, we were at Revel (in Minneapolis, right?) too, so I almost DID write this!  I didn't go, but my husband took our daughter.  He messaged me frequently with comments like "these judges love bendy kids".  Unfortunately, we're seeing a lot of that lately, and my daughter (age 12) is considering not competing a solo anymore, at least until her body can do some of the tricks that seem to be required to win competitions lately.

One thing that does give me hope for her future...at the MTA audition at Revel, the teacher stated something along the lines of "I saw lots of lyrical and contemporary solos last night.  Good for you, but that won't get you a job.  You need to do jazz and hip hop."  Since these are styles that my daughter excels in, I'm hoping she is right!

Good luck to you and your dancer.  Glad we all have this forum to vent to each other!
0
Suzit42

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,580
Reply with quote  #13 
I can only give you my feed back from what I have seen in my eight years. When it comes to solos, the flexible, bendy, contortionist, Acro types, place very high when they are minis and juniors. Once they are Teens and Seniors, those kind of tricks are not as important. That is because the other kids who have musicality, technique and maturity catch up to the flippers. My kid is a tap soloist. Once she hit the Teen level, she started placing sometimes. But she did three years of solos that went nowhere. One of our teams best dancers is short with musclely legs. She competes in Teen. She has two solos. One is Acro. The other is lyrical. They are both beautiful. But the lyrical has great, intricate choreo and technique. It places above the Acro solo many times. Sometimes, it's the performance and sometimes it's based on the quality of the coffee the judges are supplied.
0
rdsmom

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,473
Reply with quote  #14 
Thanks to everyone for the support. I was sad that she was sad that day. It was hard to see her work so hard to incorporate some of the critiques she has gotten, and she scored the same. It didn't really matter for more than 24 hours though. [smile] The next day, she got the full scholarship for next year, and will get to compete 1 solo for free again. So, all is well. We just had a sad day that day, so again, thanks to those who let me vent a little! 
0
Granny

Bronze Member
Registered:
Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #15 
Too bad there is so much emphasis on competition. It is the same in the music world which we have been involved in for years.  I took my daughter to a top violin teacher whose emphasis was on improving and solidifying technique. Competitions were considered an interference and counterproductive.  My daughter learned so much technique from a variety of musical styles. And she LOVED practicing (well, almost always).  She had plenty of performance opportunities (solo, chamber and orchestral) as this teacher's students were always invited to perform. 

I understand that in ballet, to do well, you have to have a ballerina's body; long, lithe and flexible. Maybe rdsmom could consider hip hop for fun for her daughter. Or how about expressing herself through piano?...or a wind instrument?  There's art, kayaking or other sports...so many things your daughter could enjoy. In any case, competitions are not the be all and end all. I wish everyone well.
0
jule425

Avatar / Picture

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 194
Reply with quote  #16 
Shoot! Wish I had known someone from this board was going to be at Revel last weekend. We were there also. My kid is a bendy one that placed high, but no scholarship, yet was called out in contemporary and was in all 3 of the showcase combos. Two kids from our studio, were in none of them and got scholarships. They seemed all over the place for what they liked.

eta: She's not built like a stereotypical dancer either. A full head or more shorter than her same age peers and the girl has thighs.
0
Jinkerbelle

Avatar / Picture

Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 61
Reply with quote  #17 
Hi, so sorry you are feeling down! I get it, I do. My daughter's teacher used to emphasize before every comp that is is so subjective and to keep in mind the only person she is really competing against is herself. It really sounds like she did just that, making changes and performing better this time than last time. If she felt better about this performance than the others.... then she really did "win". Because it should be about your personal best! Hugs
0
NCKDAD

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 238
Reply with quote  #18 
My older DD is 11. She solidly does well (too 10 at every comp this year, but consistently placing solos since starting them), but we often end up baffled by a few at the awards. She's not crazy bendy. She's an excellent performer, great musicality and good technique (although she has to really work at fully straightening her knees so can't forget that). She has no tricks but a few complicated turns. We feel like the kids with tricks get a leg up so she has to do everything else better and flawless so that she can stand out. Especially if they aren't flawless in their tricks. She knows her windows of opportunity and looks for them. I mean, we try to say worry about adjudication only bc you can't control anything but your own dance... but everyone wants that special acknowledgement [wink]

I started taking notes at comps of what stuck out for dances and saw that it wasn't uncommon for different comps to truly prefer certain aspects (judge's preference). One was all about tricks, one was the distinctly "weirdo" style of contemporary (sorry to use that term but no other way). Two appeared to care more about how well you did the dance you performed (as long as age appropriate difficulty) and one was so small I didn't bother. (Lol she did her worst performance at that one). Also if solos are at the end of a weekend we also say by then the judges have seen you on stage a million times and have already made up their decision about you as a dancer. You can't forget that they are human and recognize faces and dancers for good or bad and that opinion may carry over. The judges loved a girl at one comp- and her solo was amazing- she did a hot mess of a trio (nothing against us) and before hey went on stage I called them out as going to be the top one. We watched it completely unravel on stage but... it was first overall! And there were some great ones in that age group.

We accept what the judges say and listen to critiques, but realize sometimes it's really just personal preference. Actually a judge spent 40 seconds discussing how she may have liked a different move instrad of what was choreographed in my daughter's solo and then said "but that's probably my personal preference"... we just laughed bc she missed a lot of dancing talking about that one move of choreo that my kid has no control over- lol). And no other judge acknowledged it all year. Lol

And at the end of the day we prefer our style which so why we're at the studio we're at_ lol
0
AusDM

Bronze Member
Registered:
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #19 

My Mum and I watch my daughter's sections and it's always been a mixed bag.  As my dancer started later in comparison to some in her sections, she's definitely not "bendy" and her technique is still developing, but we tell her that she does have stage presence, i.e often receives comments that she sells a routine with her face and emotion, something that some highly competent and experienced dancers find hard to do.

I suppose it's always hard to find someone who really has it all but it's so enjoyable to watch the varying skills develop throughout the age sections.

0
aking9957

Avatar / Picture

High Bronze Member
Registered:
Posts: 49
Reply with quote  #20 
The only focus should be on improvement. When she does overall it will be much more gratifying because of all the years of hard work she put in. We always hear Teen is the toughest division because most kids sprout or it clicks by then. 

Turn it around and imagine if she did place every time. Think of the nightmare it will be when she doesn't place. 

Also, it may be something that the judges are looking for on one particular day. They may have had 20 tap numbers by time your child goes up and does their tap and they are already tapped out. Or... a lot of kids have the same facial expressions and they are just looking for something different.

We always had this at our original studio, it's frustrating. We also always had one or two of those all star studios that just dominated every competition. We stopped watching our dancers and watched ones a little older from the dominant studios. What the facials were like, emotions, little things they did and then tried to guess the winners. Then we started incorporating some of those qualities into a 9yr old and it worked. It also helps that she really connects with music and will practice for hours on end.

The practice comes from my wife, when my DD said why can't she ever win, my wife told her she could beat everyone if she out works them. She came in first at the nationals and was one of the highest scoring solos of the week because she told a story with her dance better than anyone else. She sucked them in and held them for the 2 1/2 minutes and didn't let go and she did that twice. When we finally got the video she was not actually that good, it was just that moment when she was on stage, she captured everyone.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation: