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kmpmom

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Reply with quote  #51 
Sorry folks ...the death yesterday just hit really close to home. My apologies for hijacking the thread.  
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beachgirl

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Reply with quote  #52 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MinnDanceMom
I was about to respond and then as I read all the posts I discovered that a response was no longer necessary. Wow. Of all the things to make up.


Today is the first day I came to this particular thread. Unbelievable. I will have to say that I used to be a "give them the benefit of the doubt" person, but I've become much more skeptical.

OAN so sad about the girl at Queens. [frown]
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #53 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmpmom
Unfortunately, statements like yours just give fuel to the fire of people who don't believe allergies are that big of a deal.  Just because some are faking it (and trust me, I agree with you that there are a lot of parents demanding epi pens for God knows what reason but it's not allergies!), doesn't negate the fact it's a truly life threatening, life long, daily issue for a lot of people.  I would prefer if your statement didn't run the two sides together because that just perpetuates it.

In our case, if we had not micromanaged her life from day one, she may not have seen day 2.  She was diagnosed 12 years ago and despite vigilance by us when she was young, and by herself and her own voice as soon as she was able, she's been frequently offered food by someone that may have sent her into anaphylactic shock.  If not for her "micromanaging", I don't even want to think about what would have happened.  

Would you say the same thing to a diabetic btw?  Oh, don't bother micromanaging your sugar levels, in the end it won't do you any good.  

Where you really need to watch your words is the statement about anaphylactics needing to learn to live in the real world.  If they didn't know how to do that, many wouldn't be alive to read your words.  Yes, DD is protected within the walls of her school, but she's only there 6 hours a day.  We have been very assertive with ensuring that she does not shy away from being a normal child.  From the time she was able to speak, she has been the one to address servers in restaurants, "I am allergic to peanuts" her little quiet voice would say.  Her father and I never did it for her.  Since she could read, she has read or asked for the ingredients in every restaurant dish she has been served.  On airplanes, she introduces herself to the flight attendant, shows her epi pen, and asks the flight attendant to help her if she  needs it.  When we're at competitions, she brings wipes to quietly clean off the tables before she sits down to eat, and packs her own hand cleaners for in the change rooms.  She's not loud about it and she's not aggressive about it. But it's her reality and she has to deal with it.  And out in the real world, not some sheltered existence.

Perhaps you've been subjected only or mainly to the wannabe anaphylactics.  Frankly, I'd trade places with them any day.



IDK... I think you might be reading too much into my words here.  I was only addressing your admonishment of those who you sensed were not on board 110% w/you... nothing more.   And purposely limited my comments to:  1) "some" are overstating (not faking) the particulars of their child's own situation & 2) at the end of the day, these kids (those whose parents are overstating their child's condition as well as those whose parents are not) do have to learn to live in the real world. 

Tbh, I'd be surprised if anyone could argue w/#1.  And #2?  Well, based on the bolded above, it would appear that you have, in fact, gotten the memo & are preparing your child for the real world instead of expecting that society should make her/her medical issues the center of their universe.... like "some" parents.  Including some whose children's allergies are not nearly as severe.   

I really don't see any debate here.  I think we'd probably pretty much be on the same side of the fence.... IF we were talking about the same thing [smile]


    

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mom2dancinboyngirl

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Reply with quote  #54 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmpmom
The idea of airborne peanut allergies is a bit of an urban myth.


Rare yes, urban myth no. I've experienced this personally. Now, the reaction is different when it is airborne only. For me, and everyone is different, I will start to have some difficulty breathing. I will also begin to have trouble with my eyes (they get red and watery). This only escalates if I am in a confined space (like a car or an aircraft very close to someone eating peanuts or tree nuts) or in an environment where peanut oil is used in cooking, or nuts are being roasted. Removing myself from the vicinity of the allergen is the solution that will usually reduce the symptoms pretty quickly (the red itchy eyes usually last the longest). I have never had any kind of hives from an airborne reaction, nor have I needed an EpiPen - I have to ingest it for it to become really dangerous for me. 

I know this is not psychosomatic, as I have had the reaction before seeing/smelling the allergen...  (so its not in response to some visual cue as some might contend).
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kmpmom

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Reply with quote  #55 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2dancinboyngirl
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmpmom
The idea of airborne peanut allergies is a bit of an urban myth.


Rare yes, urban myth no. I've experienced this personally. Now, the reaction is different when it is airborne only. For me, and everyone is different, I will start to have some difficulty breathing. I will also begin to have trouble with my eyes (they get red and watery). This only escalates if I am in a confined space (like a car or an aircraft very close to someone eating peanuts or tree nuts) or in an environment where peanut oil is used in cooking, or nuts are being roasted. Removing myself from the vicinity of the allergen is the solution that will usually reduce the symptoms pretty quickly (the red itchy eyes usually last the longest). I have never had any kind of hives from an airborne reaction, nor have I needed an EpiPen - I have to ingest it for it to become really dangerous for me. 

I know this is not psychosomatic, as I have had the reaction before seeing/smelling the allergen...  (so its not in response to some visual cue as some might contend).


Please understand that I do not in any way think what's happening to you is psychosomatic.  In fact, it's the same thing in many ways as what happens to DD when a peanut product touches her arm, for example.  Your body knows the dangerous element is there, and is warning you.  What I meant by airborne peanut allergies being an urban myth is they cause full anaphylaxis.  "If I go near a peanut I die" kinda thing.  But it very definitely lets an allergic person know that it's in the air/on the skin, etc.

May I ask …do you fly (on airplanes I mean, not personally). [wink]  We do fly with our daughter whenever we can and so far so good.  A lot of tray and arm-rest cleaning, and cooperation from flight attendants.  
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mom2dancinboyngirl

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Reply with quote  #56 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmpmom
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2dancinboyngirl
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmpmom
The idea of airborne peanut allergies is a bit of an urban myth.


Rare yes, urban myth no. I've experienced this personally. Now, the reaction is different when it is airborne only. For me, and everyone is different, I will start to have some difficulty breathing. I will also begin to have trouble with my eyes (they get red and watery). This only escalates if I am in a confined space (like a car or an aircraft very close to someone eating peanuts or tree nuts) or in an environment where peanut oil is used in cooking, or nuts are being roasted. Removing myself from the vicinity of the allergen is the solution that will usually reduce the symptoms pretty quickly (the red itchy eyes usually last the longest). I have never had any kind of hives from an airborne reaction, nor have I needed an EpiPen - I have to ingest it for it to become really dangerous for me. 

I know this is not psychosomatic, as I have had the reaction before seeing/smelling the allergen...  (so its not in response to some visual cue as some might contend).


Please understand that I do not in any way think what's happening to you is psychosomatic.  In fact, it's the same thing in many ways as what happens to DD when a peanut product touches her arm, for example.  Your body knows the dangerous element is there, and is warning you.  What I meant by airborne peanut allergies being an urban myth is they cause full anaphylaxis.  "If I go near a peanut I die" kinda thing.  But it very definitely lets an allergic person know that it's in the air/on the skin, etc.

May I ask …do you fly (on airplanes I mean, not personally). [wink]  We do fly with our daughter whenever we can and so far so good.  A lot of tray and arm-rest cleaning, and cooperation from flight attendants.  


Agree with you there... definitely no where near as serious a reaction. More like a reversible warning... I think that's a good definition of what it is.

And yes, I do fly, at least once or twice a year. If it's an airline that serves peanuts I will advise the gate agent that the airborne aspect is an issue for me and show them my Epi pens. They will either not serve in the immediate vicinity (a couple of aisles ahead and behind) or occasionally they will decide not to serve the entire flight (it is entirely the flight crew's call how they want to respond, I never ask for anything that extreme, but am always grateful when they suggest it). If they don't serve any peanuts, I usually just play it by ear, keeping an eye out for what people are bringing on board to eat. If my seatmates look to be breaking out the mixed nuts or PBJ sandwiches I will advise them of my problem and suggest that I will try to see if I can move to a new seat so that they are not inconvenienced. I've never had a problem where anyone freaked out on me or got huffy, but then I tend to be as low key and non dramatic about it as possible.  And... most people would rather avoid a medical incident in the air, so really it's in everyone's best interest not to provoke an allergic reaction in one of their fellow passengers [wink]
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cheeranddancemom03

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Reply with quote  #57 
I meant to reply earlier, but I have not had the time. I really do want to apologize for my behavior. I want to start over with you all. I know I am not a great mother or a person, for that matter. I do not know as much as you all do about dance or parenting. My life suddenly changed when I had kids and again when my DD14 died. I feel like an awful mother and an even worse person for coming on here and invading your space. If you all want me to leave, feel free to tell me and I will get out of your hair. Best Wishes, cheeranddancemom03
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Becca

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Reply with quote  #58 

I think it's time that you stopped this and found some sort of help for whatever you are dealing with that is leading you to come to this site and make up lie after lie in search of support and attention.

I am very worried about you and I don't know you but your actions make me think you are deeply unhappy and\or ill. There is help. I am not sure what your support system is in real life- if you are an adult or a child, if you feel alone or ignored, if you feel empowered when you lie or are just so caught up in all this fakeness that you just can't stop but there is help if you want it.

I don't know a lot but I am worried about you.

I am scared for you.

I don't know you but I promise whatever you are dealing with that leads you to do this that there is help. I swear to you that there is help for you. Please seek out some.

Maybe for now the lying is just something "fun" to pass your time but believe me when I say your life can be more than this. You can have real relationships with people. You need to get off your computer and seek out some support. 

Please, please get help. No one believes anything you say but I think we all wish you that you knew your life can be better than this. You do not need to lie to strangers on the internet. I am sorry if you feel alone or unloved or you like "making fools" of us but I stand here and say I know you can be a better person than this.

Wishing you all the best from the bottom of my heart.

Becca

 

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kristenbrown0082

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Reply with quote  #59 
I know this is an old thread but I'm new.... I have a few comments....
#1... To the person making things up about peanut allergies.... NOT ACCEPTABLE! You need serious help. My daughter is 13 now and almost died at 18 months old from ONE bite of a peanut butter cookie. This is a very real, sensitive topic that people do not take seriously due to people like you or people faking allergies because they don't like something.
#2... Airborne allergies are very real. As well as contact and ingestive reactions. My daughter has all 3. And has had anaphylactic reactions due to all 3.
#3... There is no FAAN.... There is FARE (Food Allergy Research & Eduaction) ... I am actually the Indiana Co-Chair. And there is FAACT (Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Connection Team)
#4... Class 6 is the highest an allergy can be with numbers up to 100. My daughters peanut is class 6, number 100+. And her Tree nuts vary depending which one it is.
#5... You have to shelter your child depending on the severity of their allergy growing up. We don't go to restaurants, never fly on planes and my DD never will, don't do buses, trains, grocery stores with open bins of nuts. You have to tailor your life to protect your child. At 13, she manages her allergies well by herself and advocates for herself. Her school doesn't serve peanut products. She has her own accommodations at school. She lives a normal life, just carries 2 EpiPens and an inhaler every place she goes. [smile]
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KB

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Reply with quote  #60 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kristenbrown0082
I know this is an old thread but I'm new.... I have a few comments.... #1... To the person making things up about peanut allergies.... NOT ACCEPTABLE! You need serious help. My daughter is 13 now and almost died at 18 months old from ONE bite of a peanut butter cookie. This is a very real, sensitive topic that people do not take seriously due to people like you or people faking allergies because they don't like something. #2... Airborne allergies are very real. As well as contact and ingestive reactions. My daughter has all 3. And has had anaphylactic reactions due to all 3. #3... There is no FAAN.... There is FARE (Food Allergy Research & Eduaction) ... I am actually the Indiana Co-Chair. And there is FAACT (Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Connection Team) #4... Class 6 is the highest an allergy can be with numbers up to 100. My daughters peanut is class 6, number 100+. And her Tree nuts vary depending which one it is. #5... You have to shelter your child depending on the severity of their allergy growing up. We don't go to restaurants, never fly on planes and my DD never will, don't do buses, trains, grocery stores with open bins of nuts. You have to tailor your life to protect your child. At 13, she manages her allergies well by herself and advocates for herself. Her school doesn't serve peanut products. She has her own accommodations at school. She lives a normal life, just carries 2 EpiPens and an inhaler every place she goes. [smile]


Re: #3

There was a FAAN. It was the original advocacy and education network for people with food allergies. They created tons of resources for communicating with people about food allergies - for schools, doctors, kids, etc. 

FAAN merged with another food allergy resource organization and became FARE. There are still lots of print (and online) resources out there that carry the FAAN name. My daughter was diagnosed in 2009, before the merger, and some of our stuff still has FAAN on it. I don't remember when it became FARE, but it was definitely post 2009.
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