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cheeranddancemom03

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Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancermom128
Convenient. I hope to God you really don't have kids and that you've just made it your mission to mess with us. Because the alternative is just too scary to think about. You've outstayed your welcome. Again.

I don't see how you could think this. I am sorry if I seem to be overstepping my bounds. I do not want to burn my bridges and I apologize if I did.
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KB

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Reply with quote  #27 
Well crap. I got sucked right in to that one.
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dancermom128

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Reply with quote  #28 
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Originally Posted by KB
Well crap. I got sucked right in to that one.


Happens to the best of us.
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3dancinggirls

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Reply with quote  #29 
I find this odd & disturbing...why do people do this?
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dancedaughters

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Reply with quote  #30 
To the OP - I'm quite certain you don't actually have children with serious medical issues, because the one thing you don't seem to get right is the timetable for dealing with medical issues.  Anyone who has dealt with these kinds of things knows that an out-of-the-blue allergic reaction on Friday would not result in you having a complete diagnosis on Sunday and be at the point where you're trying to figure out details like what to do about mats and barres at the dance studio.

Also, if your kid really had a serious enough sensitivity to touch that you're worried about the barres and mats, I am finding it hard to believe that she survived the ingestion of a PBJ.  

We have some kids at our studio who have life-threatening nut allergies.  It's a serious but manageable situation.  
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3dancinggirls
I find this odd & disturbing...why do people do this?


Because they can.  This place is a magnet for them.  

Of course, many of us can put our finger on them within short order... but instead of issuing an immediate challenge we choose to just sit back.  And watch.  And wait.

We're waiting.

   


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meatball77

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Reply with quote  #32 
I was trying to figure out how an eleven year old could suddenly become so allergic to peanuts that they had airborne issues.  Somehow a kid made it to eleven without ever having a reaction and then suddenly peanut dust is going to kill them.
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tendumom

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Reply with quote  #33 

I did some reading on the topic because I truly wanted to know how it could be determined that touching residue can be known to be an issue at the initial time of diagnosis when the allergen was actually ingested. 

It was interesting to read the medical literature. I could find nothing that would indicate how it would be determined that touch would be an issue. What I did find were actually studies that indicate that the majority with severe peanut allergies are actually NOT affected in either any way or in a severe way by touching peanut butter. These were studies where peanut butter was actually placed on the skin of children who were known to have had severe reactions. The residue need to be in the mouth or eye, so it would have to go from the hand to the face. Also read about airborne peanut allergies. According to the literature, the actual protein needs to be inhaled, so these types of events are generally ocurring only in confined spaces. The person with the allergy would need to be close enough to the whatever might be airborne. 

As far as the sudden development of an allergy, it happens. Sometimes there are identifiable smaller reactions beforehand, but not always. Allergies can develop at any age, including those severe enough to cause anaphylaxis. The development of an allergy requires a previous exposure... it can be one exposure or many. 

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JulieDB

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Reply with quote  #34 
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatball77
I was trying to figure out how an eleven year old could suddenly become so allergic to peanuts that they had airborne issues.  Somehow a kid made it to eleven without ever having a reaction and then suddenly peanut dust is going to kill them.


It would be quite rare!  I suddenly had problems with almonds and pistachios as an adult but it's OAS.  Won't kill me but not pleasant.

I can't see someone who has eaten peanuts with no problems all their life suddenly having a life threatening reaction.  But I guess stranger things have happened.
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JulieDB

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Reply with quote  #35 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tendumom

I did some reading on the topic because I truly wanted to know how it could be determined that touching residue can be known to be an issue at the initial time of diagnosis when the allergen was actually ingested. 

It was interesting to read the medical literature. I could find nothing that would indicate how it would be determined that touch would be an issue. What I did find were actually studies that indicate that the majority with severe peanut allergies are actually NOT affected in either any way or in a severe way by touching peanut butter. These were studies where peanut butter was actually placed on the skin of children who were known to have had severe reactions. The residue need to be in the mouth or eye, so it would have to go from the hand to the face. Also read about airborne peanut allergies. According to the literature, the actual protein needs to be inhaled, so these types of events are generally ocurring only in confined spaces. The person with the allergy would need to be close enough to the whatever might be airborne. 

As far as the sudden development of an allergy, it happens. Sometimes there are identifiable smaller reactions beforehand, but not always. Allergies can develop at any age, including those severe enough to cause anaphylaxis. The development of an allergy requires a previous exposure... it can be one exposure or many. 



We did have one girl at our studio have a life threatening reaction but it was never figured out what the culprit was.  I would guess her age to be around 10 at the time.  Mom thought it was peanuts because she had eaten a peanut butter cookie but allergy testing turned nothing up.

I do know that weird things can happen because I am one who gets the weird things.  Right now I am itching all over and my eyes are irritated.  And I've had a rash on my face since June.  Still waiting to see the dermatologist.  But wound up in the ER a few weeks ago with an allergic reaction to something I tried to try to clear up the rash.  

I don't know if it was an herb I took or something I applied to my skin.  I had hives in my eyes and my nose swelled to the point where it was puffed up so much that it was partially obscuring my eyes.  And yes, I have seen allergist several times in my life.  I used to have a life threatening bee allergy but no longer do.

Anyway... I would never make light of somebody's allergies.  This kind of stuff is no fun at all to have to deal with.  I just can't see why someone would bother to make something up like this.  It's sad and pathetic.


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dancemonkey

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Reply with quote  #36 
I know two students in our studio with nut or peanut allergies. The peanut allergy child was diagnosed very young. The Tree Nut allergy at 11. There's no presanitizing the barres done at the studio. But I do know those kids are vigilant hand washers. I'm sorry you lost a child. What is ED?
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My2DanceLoves

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Reply with quote  #37 
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmymom
Wasn't the other mother with the 15 Christmas trees, the grand staircase, the grand foyer and grand life with all the kids who were either broken boned or suffering some other way, wasn't she tumbledancecheermama or something as her user name?  Seems kind of coincidental...
 

I believe the grand foyer and 15 Christmas trees was under an alias that involved NewJersey in some fashion .... but we suspect same person as dancetumblecheer - something or other .... then the Russian names ... who knew each other ..... there were 2 other names , who also knew each other but they escape me at the moment.  The ones who seem to know each other either back each other up or they are at odds.

But there are always a few recurring themes to look for.... not all are always present ...they like to mix it up and keep us on our toes.

Twins
cheer
illness, injury or trauma (usually with a strange time line involved) (Munchausen much?)
grandiose lifestyle
very unique children's names that they drop freely and repeatedly in their comments

There are more I'm forgetting but they usually pop up on the scene amid a flurry of posts and ALWAYS they seem to forget their own personal details and eventually expose themselves. 

ETA:   There are a few members with cheer/tumble in their name that are legit .... didn't want to alienate anyone unfairly.
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dancermom128

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Reply with quote  #38 
Quote:
Originally Posted by My2DanceLoves
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmymom
Wasn't the other mother with the 15 Christmas trees, the grand staircase, the grand foyer and grand life with all the kids who were either broken boned or suffering some other way, wasn't she tumbledancecheermama or something as her user name?  Seems kind of coincidental...
 

I believe the grand foyer and 15 Christmas trees was under an alias that involved NewJersey in some fashion .... but we suspect same person as dancetumblecheer - something or other .... then the Russian names ... who knew each other ..... there were 2 other names , who also knew each other but they escape me at the moment.  The ones who seem to know each other either back each other up or they are at odds.

But there are always a few recurring themes to look for.... not all are always present ...they like to mix it up and keep us on our toes.

Twins
cheer
illness, injury or trauma (usually with a strange time line involved) (Munchausen much?)
grandiose lifestyle
very unique children's names that they drop freely and repeatedly in their comments

There are more I'm forgetting but they usually pop up on the scene amid a flurry of posts and ALWAYS they seem to forget their own personal details and eventually expose themselves. 




They also tend to be really nice when initially confronted. A little too nice. Like in this case. No outrage. Just a nice little comment like "oh golly gee, I don't know why anyone would do that. I hate to have offended any of you nice people". That either changes rapidly or they just *poof* disappear.
And, yes, there's a group of us that recognize this poser almost instantly. Like in the first post. We just wait until the inevitable slip up to come out and say something.
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #39 
Quote:
Originally Posted by My2DanceLoves
Quote:
Originally Posted by emmymom
Wasn't the other mother with the 15 Christmas trees, the grand staircase, the grand foyer and grand life with all the kids who were either broken boned or suffering some other way, wasn't she tumbledancecheermama or something as her user name?  Seems kind of coincidental...
 

I believe the grand foyer and 15 Christmas trees was under an alias that involved NewJersey in some fashion .... but we suspect same person as dancetumblecheer - something or other .... then the Russian names ... who knew each other ..... there were 2 other names , who also knew each other but they escape me at the moment.  The ones who seem to know each other either back each other up or they are at odds.

But there are always a few recurring themes to look for.... not all are always present ...they like to mix it up and keep us on our toes.

Twins
cheer
illness, injury or trauma (usually with a strange time line involved) (Munchausen much?)
grandiose lifestyle
very unique children's names that they drop freely and repeatedly in their comments

There are more I'm forgetting but they usually pop up on the scene amid a flurry of posts and ALWAYS they seem to forget their own personal details and eventually expose themselves. 




Aaaaah yes.  So far it's always been a number of girls in the family.  And they typically do a combination of cheerleading, dance and tumbling/gymnastics. The children tend to be very talented in everything they do.   And, yes, there are generally a number of medical issues.  Interesting medical issues. And over the top scenarios. 

Another thing I notice is an unusual delivery.  And it can be one extreme or the the other.  The fly in bomb dropper where they post a serious question in 2 sentences or less with very little background info.  Or, on the flip side, the casual helpful reply that includes a lot of unnecessary extraneous information... info that frequently borders on the inappropriate (i.e.  "hi, I'm Sue and I'm so glad to be here.  I have 3 dd's but one died from an eating disorder.  Have a nice day").  

If nothing else it keeps us on our toes [smile]
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StepLeap

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Reply with quote  #40 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancemonkey
I'm sorry you lost a child. What is ED?



I was wondering what ED was as well. I can only think of one thing and I don't think girls can have that problem or die from it...

On a side note- I have loved pineapple my whole life. I would get a small rash near my mouth, but it never bothered me. Now at 40, I'm looking at epipens- it just suddenly got worse about 5 years ago. But there were gradual signs and a ton of exposure. Maybe too much. 
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dncemom01

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Reply with quote  #41 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StepLeap
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancemonkey
I'm sorry you lost a child. What is ED?



I was wondering what ED was as well. I can only think of one thing and I don't think girls can have that problem or die from it...

On a side note- I have loved pineapple my whole life. I would get a small rash near my mouth, but it never bothered me. Now at 40, I'm looking at epipens- it just suddenly got worse about 5 years ago. But there were gradual signs and a ton of exposure. Maybe too much. 


In this case ED means eating disorder
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StepLeap

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Reply with quote  #42 
Thanks! Nothing would come up when I searched. I need to study my acronyms!
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dncemom01

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Reply with quote  #43 
My dd has an allergy to peanuts and tree nuts that was diagnosed at 2.  Walnuts are the worst for her causing the most severe reaction.  Her is not airborne or touch sensitive, she has to actually ingest for a reaction.  We are extremely lucky.  We had a mom at our old studio that came in one day saying that her dd was severely allergic and couldn't even be around the dust, couldn't ever fly etc etc  You know the extreme over the top ( there was ALWAYS something wrong with her dd) yet she took her daughter to the store with the bulk bins etc etc.  She tried really hard to get nuts banned at the studio and such, yet couldn't ever explain how her daughter could be around it at the grocery store.   It really pissed those of us moms ho kids had real issues, our kids would love to not have an allergy or issue.
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kmpmom

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Reply with quote  #44 
DD14 has a 4+++ allergy to peanuts - that's the top of the scale for anaphylaxis.  The idea of airborne peanut allergies is a bit of an urban myth.  Sure, if the peanut enzyme landed on DD's skin either by her touching it or some other casual contact she would very likely swell up in that area and could get an outbreak of hives - similar to what happens during her bi-annual scratch test at the allergist.   (I won't go into the longer details of the preventative elements that kick in so the story doesn't go off topic).  What she has to do is INGEST the enzyme and that can come even without swallowing due to the way the salivary glands work.  

Fortunately in Canada we have had some of the most strict nut allergy laws of any country for a very long time.  All schools are completely peanut/nut free, and following suit every child-centered activity we've ever come across has been the same.  

BUT, DD still has to be careful.  What she does is keeps her hands away from her face, and in particular her mouth.  She washes her hands regularly.  She never eats anything without a label, and never shares food or cutlery/straws.  

She has to live her life.  I have terrible concerns about what will happen when she's out of the house and say, at a university party and drinks too much and doesn't use her regular precautions.  I just have to pray that either she, or someone with her, is smart enough to know what to do, and how rapidly the situation can go from "Look, she's swelling up" to a far worse outcome that I can't even type out.  We've been told she'd have 10 - 12 minutes without medical intervention.  

ETA - people like the OP who treat this like a joke have a serious problem.
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Klba37

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Reply with quote  #45 

I understand! I used to eat peanut butter daily until my mid 30's. All of the sudden I can't be around it! My tongue starts tingling and throat starts closing up. It can happen at a later age. I keep epi pen with me.
We have several at the studio highly allergic. SO & 1 major DT (her son attends and highly allergic) have asked everyone to not bring in any form of peanut butter. Our studio makes sure to wipe down barres if anyone allergic is in their class.

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MinnDanceMom

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Reply with quote  #46 
I was about to respond and then as I read all the posts I discovered that a response was no longer necessary. Wow. Of all the things to make up.
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tappinmom

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Reply with quote  #47 
Life threatening allergies can definitely come along in adult life.  I have been taking Naproxen since I was 12 years old pretty regularly for injuries.  The last time I took it at 30 I ended up in the emergency room in total anaphylactic shock and my blood pressure actually dropped so low that they had to bring me back.  I had never had any kind of reaction to it at all in the previous 18 years. 
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kmpmom

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Reply with quote  #48 
Extremely sad news to share …just as we were talking about this here on the Boards, and as I was mentioning that my concern with DD14s allergy is for when she goes away to university, a first year student at Queen's University in Kingston has died from anaphylactic shock.  I learned of it last evening from a friend's FB post but only learned the details this morning.  She bought a smoothie on campus which had "potentially undeclared allergens" in it.  She did not have her Epi Pen with her.  While the errors this beautiful young woman made cost her her life, just the thought that it could happen that fast, to someone so young and vibrant, doing something so innocent.  Simply heartbreaking.  

For those of you who think that food allergies are blown out of proportion, please remember this story. How many other kids bought that same smoothie that day and enjoyed it sitting on the lawns of their new university campus on a beautiful sunny Fall day.  But for this girl, it ended her life.

Rest in peace Andrea Mariano.
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #49 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmpmom
Extremely sad news to share …just as we were talking about this here on the Boards, and as I was mentioning that my concern with DD14s allergy is for when she goes away to university, a first year student at Queen's University in Kingston has died from anaphylactic shock.  I learned of it last evening from a friend's FB post but only learned the details this morning.  She bought a smoothie on campus which had "potentially undeclared allergens" in it.  She did not have her Epi Pen with her.  While the errors this beautiful young woman made cost her her life, just the thought that it could happen that fast, to someone so young and vibrant, doing something so innocent.  Simply heartbreaking.  

For those of you who think that food allergies are blown out of proportion, please remember this story. How many other kids bought that same smoothie that day and enjoyed it sitting on the lawns of their new university campus on a beautiful sunny Fall day.  But for this girl, it ended her life.

Rest in peace Andrea Mariano.



But they are.  Just because there are some who do in fact have serious life-threatening allergies doesn't mean that some aren't making more out of their particular issue then need be.  And, at the end of the day, even those who do need to learn how to live in the real world.  So micromanaging their environments from day one really doesn't do them any favors in the long run.
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kmpmom

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Reply with quote  #50 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidi459
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmpmom
Extremely sad news to share …just as we were talking about this here on the Boards, and as I was mentioning that my concern with DD14s allergy is for when she goes away to university, a first year student at Queen's University in Kingston has died from anaphylactic shock.  I learned of it last evening from a friend's FB post but only learned the details this morning.  She bought a smoothie on campus which had "potentially undeclared allergens" in it.  She did not have her Epi Pen with her.  While the errors this beautiful young woman made cost her her life, just the thought that it could happen that fast, to someone so young and vibrant, doing something so innocent.  Simply heartbreaking.  

For those of you who think that food allergies are blown out of proportion, please remember this story. How many other kids bought that same smoothie that day and enjoyed it sitting on the lawns of their new university campus on a beautiful sunny Fall day.  But for this girl, it ended her life.

Rest in peace Andrea Mariano.



But they are.  Just because there are some who do in fact have serious life-threatening allergies doesn't mean that some aren't making more out of their particular issue then need be.  And, at the end of the day, even those who do need to learn how to live in the real world.  So micromanaging their environments from day one really doesn't do them any favors in the long run.


Unfortunately, statements like yours just give fuel to the fire of people who don't believe allergies are that big of a deal.  Just because some are faking it (and trust me, I agree with you that there are a lot of parents demanding epi pens for God knows what reason but it's not allergies!), doesn't negate the fact it's a truly life threatening, life long, daily issue for a lot of people.  I would prefer if your statement didn't run the two sides together because that just perpetuates it.

In our case, if we had not micromanaged her life from day one, she may not have seen day 2.  She was diagnosed 12 years ago and despite vigilance by us when she was young, and by herself and her own voice as soon as she was able, she's been frequently offered food by someone that may have sent her into anaphylactic shock.  If not for her "micromanaging", I don't even want to think about what would have happened.  

Would you say the same thing to a diabetic btw?  Oh, don't bother micromanaging your sugar levels, in the end it won't do you any good.  

Where you really need to watch your words is the statement about anaphylactics needing to learn to live in the real world.  If they didn't know how to do that, many wouldn't be alive to read your words.  Yes, DD is protected within the walls of her school, but she's only there 6 hours a day.  We have been very assertive with ensuring that she does not shy away from being a normal child.  From the time she was able to speak, she has been the one to address servers in restaurants, "I am allergic to peanuts" her little quiet voice would say.  Her father and I never did it for her.  Since she could read, she has read or asked for the ingredients in every restaurant dish she has been served.  On airplanes, she introduces herself to the flight attendant, shows her epi pen, and asks the flight attendant to help her if she  needs it.  When we're at competitions, she brings wipes to quietly clean off the tables before she sits down to eat, and packs her own hand cleaners for in the change rooms.  She's not loud about it and she's not aggressive about it. But it's her reality and she has to deal with it.  And out in the real world, not some sheltered existence.

Perhaps you've been subjected only or mainly to the wannabe anaphylactics.  Frankly, I'd trade places with them any day.

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