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Cookmomx3

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Reply with quote  #26 
My oldest started dance at 8/9 (I forget when exactly). She is now 14 and really at the same level as her peers that started dancing at 3. In our experience, it didn't matter when you started! We have new dancers coming into our studio at all ages. Seems weird a studio would turn anyone away! No matter the age. Aren't they a business???
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my2miracles

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Reply with quote  #27 
My dd didn't start dance until she was 6 and we had no problem finding a good studio (one that's been in business now almost 40 years).  I know a dancer who just got accepted into Joffrey Chicago.  She is planning a professional career.  She's now 18 but didn't start dance at all until she was 9.

On the other note, my dd has been dancing for 8 years and I know very little about dance.  I work full-time and have many other things to deal with.  I don't need to know everything she is learning. I know enough to know she's getting good training and I'm done.  I have gotten flamed a few times on here because of that but that's how I roll.   It's dd's thing not mine.  I just pay the bills.
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by my2miracles
My dd didn't start dance until she was 6 and we had no problem finding a good studio (one that's been in business now almost 40 years).  I know a dancer who just got accepted into Joffrey Chicago.  She is planning a professional career.  She's now 18 but didn't start dance at all until she was 9.

On the other note, my dd has been dancing for 8 years and I know very little about dance.  I work full-time and have many other things to deal with.  I don't need to know everything she is learning. I know enough to know she's getting good training and I'm done.  I have gotten flamed a few times on here because of that but that's how I roll.   It's dd's thing not mine.  I just pay the bills.


Really?  Is it possible you misunderstood?

What is there to know beyond knowing enough to know the difference btw good training and no-so-good training?  I only remember people taking issue with the "I know nothing, they're the experts, I just leave everything up to them" camp.  Especially for that dancer who might be interested in a performance career.  There's just too much at stake to put the whole kit and kaboodle in someone else's hands, ya know?  Heck, if I'd done that, dd'd be going nowhere fast.    


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DanceTumbleCheerMom

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Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaBallerina
Quote:
Originally Posted by heartmom
What city are you in? I'm just really confused by most everything you wrote. We've lived in a couple different SMALL cities, and in each one there are multiple, like at least 5, studios where a young child can take dance. Once they are 3, they can dance. No one cares if they've ever danced before or if they are in school- not a one of them??? I was thinking the same thing. I live in a VERY small city and we still have 3 dance studios here, and a couple more within a 20 minute drive. They all accept students of any age and ability.



I can relate to this as well.  In our small UT town where my girls started, we had 3 very good studios.   Even where we are now we have 2, but there are some amazing studios in Pittsburgh less then an hour away. 
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my2miracles

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidi459


Really?  Is it possible you misunderstood?

What is there to know beyond knowing enough to know the difference btw good training and no-so-good training?  I only remember people taking issue with the "I know nothing, they're the experts, I just leave everything up to them" camp.  Especially for that dancer who might be interested in a performance career.  There's just too much at stake to put the whole kit and kaboodle in someone else's hands, ya know?  Heck, if I'd done that, dd'd be going nowhere fast.    





The flame was about specific dance programs post high school and how different they were and me not knowing that. It wasn't about my dd's training or even my dd at all.


And dd's doing just fine thanks!
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ladybug1993

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Reply with quote  #31 
I have a 9 year old and even as an experienced mom I think that if I had a DT who told me my daughter has the potential to be a great ballerina...yes...I would have an excited heart but then reality would set back in and I would have to realize that she IS 9 years old. My 9 year old may decide in middle school that she wants to do music or volleyball or the school play. These are the things that I want my DD to experience. Dancing is like athletics. Only the smallest percentage of kids end up in the professional ranks and they got there with not only natural talent but their whole lives revolved around the sport or dance. I want my daughter to experience everything her young life has to offer and if SHE comes to me and says she has tried anything she wants to try and THEN says "I want to own my own dance studio..be the next Misty Copeland...or..go to college and dance in college" then and only then will I worry about the type of advanced training she is going to need. Let her be a kid for as long as she can and let her have fun first then serious training when the right time comes to do that.
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by my2miracles



The flame was about specific dance programs post high school and how different they were and me not knowing that. It wasn't about my dd's training or even my dd at all.


And dd's doing just fine thanks!


Maybe I'm misunderstanding the bolded but in case I'm not I'll say... I don't believe I ever questioned that.  Not sure anyone else ever has either.  I do hope you understand that these discussions are rarely personal. They're about the general topic as it applies to all dancers everywhere.

And to clarify, the conversations I was referring to focused on the fact that there is some risk involved in putting our dancer's dance training completely in someone else's hands.  And as I recall people have tended to push that message only when someone has seemed to be suggesting otherwise... intentionally or not.  Ultimately, if your (the general your) dancer is happy where she is and doesn't have any lofty long range dance goals, the likelihood of which are going to be greatly dependent on the decisions that are made today, it may not matter how invested a parent is in all the little details.  But if you've got a kid with lofty goals? That awareness is key.  And I can't even wrap my head around how someone might think that is debatable.



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dave9988

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Reply with quote  #33 

Quote:
Originally Posted by heidi459

And to clarify, the conversations I was referring to focused on the fact that there is some risk involved in putting our dancer's dance training completely in someone else's hands.  And as I recall people have tended to push that message only when someone has seemed to be suggesting otherwise... intentionally or not.  Ultimately, if your (the general your) dancer is happy where she is and doesn't have any lofty long range dance goals, the likelihood of which are going to be greatly dependent on the decisions that are made today, it may not matter how invested a parent is in all the little details.  But if you've got a kid with lofty goals? That awareness is key.  And I can't even wrap my head around how someone might think that is debatable.


I can't disagree with that.  Though there are some who really want to flame anyone who does rely on one studio for the bulk of their pre-HS training, regardless of what research you've done, knowledge you have, or history you've witnessed. 

That tactic might not be the best plan in general, and could fail miserably in many (quite possibly most) circumstances. But that doesn't mean your dancer is doomed if you've done your research, and have determined they're in a good place.

 

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my2miracles

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Reply with quote  #34 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidi459


Maybe I'm misunderstanding the bolded but in case I'm not I'll say... I don't believe I ever questioned that.  Not sure anyone else ever has either.  I do hope you understand that these discussions are rarely personal. They're about the general topic as it applies to all dancers everywhere.

And to clarify, the conversations I was referring to focused on the fact that there is some risk involved in putting our dancer's dance training completely in someone else's hands.  And as I recall people have tended to push that message only when someone has seemed to be suggesting otherwise... intentionally or not.  Ultimately, if your (the general your) dancer is happy where she is and doesn't have any lofty long range dance goals, the likelihood of which are going to be greatly dependent on the decisions that are made today, it may not matter how invested a parent is in all the little details.  But if you've got a kid with lofty goals? That awareness is key.  And I can't even wrap my head around how someone might think that is debatable.





I guess the difference for me is that DD was older when she got serious about dance.  And she has always done research on anything she is interested in.  I'm not relying on teachers, I'm relying on DD.  The fact that I don't know every detail about every dance move or dance program or famous choreographer is not necessary.  DD's got that.

But like I said our situation is different.
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #35 
Quote:
Originally Posted by my2miracles


I guess the difference for me is that DD was older when she got serious about dance.  And she has always done research on anything she is interested in.  I'm not relying on teachers, I'm relying on DD.  The fact that I don't know every detail about every dance move or dance program or famous choreographer is not necessary.  DD's got that.

But like I said our situation is different.


I do get all that.  Seems you're still very much misunderstanding my point though.  Every dance/dance program/famous choreographer? That's not at all what I meant when I said that a parent of a child w/lofty long term dance goals might want to be invested in the details. But even beyond that....you still seem to be taking the comments personally.  Or at the very least wanting to keep bringing the discussion back to you/your dd.  Not sure why the disconnect.  Your dd isn't even interested in pursuing a professional dance performance career, am I right?  So all these comments?  About parents of serious dancers training in the hopes of pursuing a professional performance career perhaps needing to be more invested in the process?  They aren't even directed towards someone like you.   


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jeanne4379

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Reply with quote  #36 
I suggest that the OP read the other threads about what it takes to be in a company as a ballerina - or even in a contemporary company for that matter.  Right now, while the dancer is young and just starting, it should all be about the sheer joy of the experience. Let her love her time in class for al it's worth.  After that, the more you pick up from the other threads the better you will be to steer yourself through all that comes along.  Even for yourself, don't worry about 10 years - or even 5 years from now.  Just enjoy things as they are now.  There's no telling what will happen in the future.
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DanceTumbleCheerMom

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Reply with quote  #37 
After thinking about this for a few days I am wondering if the OP was looking at specific types of studios, like a Pre Pro or one attached to a ballet company.  In that case I can understand her situation.   
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tiptoemom

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Reply with quote  #38 
No, pre-pro schools, including those attached to a company, typically do not start ballet training until 7/8. They accept new students through auditions up through trainee level.
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