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nyklane

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Reply with quote  #26 
DD8
This year: 2
Last year: 2

We are from a really small studio and that is it for opportunities. We don't do lines, or productions.  We only have 1 mini group, 1 Jr group and 1 teen group, each with 1 routine.  We have been trying to coordinate a duo or trio with some of my DD's team mates but we haven't been successful yet.  Small studio - different pace.

Part of me wants her to have more opportunities.  The other part is happy that she's going slow.
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Ca2Ny2Mo

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemykids
Just curious: competition fees must be close to the thousands of dollars per competition with over 10 dances! Especially with multiple solos and duos/trios. How many competitions do you do a year? And how can you afford it?! I must be in the wrong business for sure [rofl]
To answer the question last year she had 4, this year she has 6 and I find it steep!
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Ca2Ny2Mo

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Reply with quote  #28 
Fundraising!! We could not do without it! I’m not talking selling stuff . (Yes we do sell things but that’s not the most profitable. We work concession stands and make avg &80 per game. Without this,....we would be dead in the water. We make on average 3,000 a year . Of course that depends on how many games you choose to work.
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dancelivelovelaugh

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Reply with quote  #29 
DD turning 14 this comp season:

Last year: 14
This year: 11

I think this is relative to your own dancer. For me, my DD loves to be involved in more numbers and she experienced the full breadth of 14 last year.  With her starting freshman year in HS, being on HS kickline team, and with her acting/ modeling gigs, she chose what she loved and this included her two solos, duo, large groups, small elite groups and productions.  


PS to Prancer: The only advantage of doing 8 plus dances for my DD was that she is very versatile in different styles of dance.  I personally don't believe anyone should do more just for the sake of doing more but if there is value to advancing skills, then I am all for it.   I do believe there is a diminishing return at some point but the actual number is relative to each individual dancer, and what they receive from doing more. That's IMHO.
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MimisMom

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by prancer
Adding more dances reaches a point of diminishing returns very quickly for me, so we only accept the best dances and keep the numbers low.

This year 4 (3 groups, one solo) 
Last year 3 (2 groups, one solo)

Not to hijack the thread, but if anyone wants to share their reasons for doing 8+ dances, I am curious to hear about the advantages that come from competing in a large number of dances. 








Last year was her first year competing and she took tap, jazz, acro. We turned down ballet and production because she didn’t want to do it. This year we added lyrical to the other 3, plus she was offered a solo and trio, extended line and ballet.
I know she can handle it and she really wanted a solo, so she will work harder this year. I don’t think I would do more than 10 dances per year though, it would get way too expensive.
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #31 
I've been poking around here since 2012 & there have always been some w/2 & some w/15.  Although perhaps in recent years the number of those choosing more has increased.  My own dd started comp w/4.. ended 3 yrs later w/5 (I'm not counting the next 2 yrs of independent solos).  And if she were still competing today it would be the same.  I just could never justify more than a few hundred dollars in entry fees per comp.  Never.  Just too practical, I guess.  I'd always be asking myself 'why' & thinking of what else I could do w/all that money  LOL  But as has been mentioned... to each his own.
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MimisMom

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Reply with quote  #32 
I would also like to add that it’s really hard to choose. She’s required to take jazz and ballet, but she’s really good in acro and absolutely loves tap. And IMO is a beautiful lyrical dancer. How do I chose and limit her ???? I just can’t. 😋. However she’s not interested in hip hop or musical theatre, thank goodness.
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tappinmom

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Reply with quote  #33 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemykids
Just curious: competition fees must be close to the thousands of dollars per competition with over 10 dances! Especially with multiple solos and duos/trios. How many competitions do you do a year? And how can you afford it?! I must be in the wrong business for sure [rofl]
To answer the question last year she had 4, this year she has 6 and I find it steep!


DS isn't dancing anymore but at our first studio if you were on the elite team it was very easy to get up to 10+ numbers due to their rules.  Every dancer had to compete a line in ballet, tap, jazz and MT and then  acro, lyrical and hip hop were optional lines.  After that they had large groups in each discipline as well and if you wanted to be in a small group in something you had to be in a large group.  After that was s/d/t and to get invited to do one you had to be in the line, large group and small group in that discipline.

So an elite team dancer who competes in ballet, jazz, tap, MT, acro, lyrical and hip hop and has solos in tap and acro would have 7 lines, 2 large groups, 2 small groups and 2 solos at a minimum.  Total - 13 routines.

Most had more than that.
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mishi8

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Reply with quote  #34 
I haven't posted in this forum before. It's interesting to hear what others are doing. This year is over-the-top for dance -- my 15 year old daughter is doing: 

13 group dances with one studio: 2 lyrical, ballet, 2 tap, 2 jazz, contemporary, street jazz, 2 hip hop, dancehall, acro
3 group dances with a hip hop studio: 2 hip hop & 1 contemporary
2 solos: contemporary and student choreo contemporary, 
2 duets: tap and hip hop, 
1 trio: hip hop

21 dances total. It's crazy how the number has climbed over the years. She is also doing 9 festivals this spring. Way more than I'd like. I am trying to convince her it's time to switch to a school that focuses less on competing and more on technique.

This doesn't include dance at school (she goes to an arts high school) where she is learning 3 group dances in her classes, 1 group student choreo routine and more than one routine with an extra curricular school performance group. These dances will not compete in festivals.
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tcm118

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Reply with quote  #35 
My DD 10 was in 5 dances last year, including her 1 solo.
This year it's up to 8, including 2 solos. However, if I could go back and change I would drop one group for her. She wanted to do them all, and at this time I am a little worried about her capacity to perform that many numbers. She will do her best, and if she struggles we will know to cut back next year. Two teams she has to work harder to be on (tap and acro).
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dmjrm4

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Reply with quote  #36 
The reason my DD does a lot of dances is a bit unique, I think.  Our studio guarantees that each competitive team member will have two dances each season, both productions.  That's it.  Then, almost every weekend a choreography flies into town from NY or LA to teach a master class, hold an audition, and caste a dance.  Every weekend the team members (who want to) audition to be caste.  It is completely voluntary.  But as you can imagine, there is a lot of thrill and adrenaline around having the chance to dance for unbelievably talented and well-connected choreographers.   It has been a good "formula" for our studio and for the dancers who graduate.  So,my kid puts herself on the "chopping block" most weekends and auditions, after the audition the choreographer goes around the room and hand picks who they want in their dance, and dismisses the rest.  It is hard core.  My DD has had an extra good year to be caste in 13 dances.  I have put the brakes on now due to finances, my DD is done auditioning for the season, and there are still four more choreographers coming in December (including Travis Wall).  I think it is a unique way to do it, and we love the incredible variety of dancing styles and the opportunities it is bringing.
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prancer

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Reply with quote  #37 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tappinmom


DS isn't dancing anymore but at our first studio if you were on the elite team it was very easy to get up to 10+ numbers due to their rules.  Every dancer had to compete a line in ballet, tap, jazz and MT and then  acro, lyrical and hip hop were optional lines.  After that they had large groups in each discipline as well and if you wanted to be in a small group in something you had to be in a large group.  After that was s/d/t and to get invited to do one you had to be in the line, large group and small group in that discipline.

So an elite team dancer who competes in ballet, jazz, tap, MT, acro, lyrical and hip hop and has solos in tap and acro would have 7 lines, 2 large groups, 2 small groups and 2 solos at a minimum.  Total - 13 routines.

Most had more than that.


Wow tappinmom - that policy is clearly built to require lots of dances, and not necessarily to promote the best dancers, but those with the deepest pockets.  I have to imagine most people don't get much from lines, and most people want a solo.  I'm guessing you were at a very large studio.  Does the studio invite the best dancers to the small groups/solos or do those who are willing to pay for more get to the small groups/solos in the end?   

My dancer has never been at a studio requiring lines.  In our previous studio we were required to do production and two other groups to get to a solo.  In the current studio, we can decide.  I really think for us - 3 dances (one being a solo) is the sweet spot for us. 
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prancer

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Reply with quote  #38 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmjrm4
The reason my DD does a lot of dances is a bit unique, I think.  Our studio guarantees that each competitive team member will have two dances each season, both productions.  That's it.  Then, almost every weekend a choreography flies into town from NY or LA to teach a master class, hold an audition, and caste a dance.  Every weekend the team members (who want to) audition to be caste.  It is completely voluntary.  But as you can imagine, there is a lot of thrill and adrenaline around having the chance to dance for unbelievably talented and well-connected choreographers.   It has been a good "formula" for our studio and for the dancers who graduate.  So,my kid puts herself on the "chopping block" most weekends and auditions, after the audition the choreographer goes around the room and hand picks who they want in their dance, and dismisses the rest.  It is hard core.  My DD has had an extra good year to be caste in 13 dances.  I have put the brakes on now due to finances, my DD is done auditioning for the season, and there are still four more choreographers coming in December (including Travis Wall).  I think it is a unique way to do it, and we love the opportunities it is bringing.


This is pretty darn amazing!  Yes, if this was the experience/reward of agreeing to comp dances, I would definitely be more excited about trying for more dances.  
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tappinmom

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Reply with quote  #39 
Quote:
Originally Posted by prancer


Wow tappinmom - that policy is clearly built to require lots of dances, and not necessarily to promote the best dancers, but those with the deepest pockets.  I have to imagine most people don't get much from lines, and most people want a solo.  I'm guessing you were at a very large studio.  Does the studio invite the best dancers to the small groups/solos or do those who are willing to pay for more get to the small groups/solos in the end?   

My dancer has never been at a studio requiring lines.  In our previous studio we were required to do production and two other groups to get to a solo.  In the current studio, we can decide.  I really think for us - 3 dances (one being a solo) is the sweet spot for us. 


This is only for the elite team which are already the best of the best.  The studio was incredibly competitive between the dancers and between the parents.  It was a badge of honor to be in as many numbers as possible.  Lines are mandatory.  Then it gets tricky.  Dancers will get invites to certain routines but everyone gets invited to do a large group and small group in each discipline.  S/d/t are also invite only.  The problem is you can't take the s/d/t unless you take all the groups you have been offered in that discipline so if you have a dancer offered solos in tap, jazz and acro in order to do them they would have to do all the groups they were offered in each of those before they could accept the solo.

It was a mega studio at that time.  It wasn't a case of whoever had the most money because the rules applied to the entire elite team and all the parents were willing to have their dancers do all the groups in order to do the solo.  In theory you could turn down large/small groups in any discipline but you lose the s/d/t and these parents were incredibly competitive and loved telling people their kids had 10+ numbers.
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BCdancemom

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Reply with quote  #40 
We moved to a new studio in October.

Last year dd had 7 including a solo and a duo

This year I think 6 including a solo and a duo
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Billpayer2000

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Reply with quote  #41 
Last year: 1 duet, 2 small groups, 1 large group. We backed off due to a little bit of burnout.
This year: 1 trio, 4 small groups, 1 large group. Because less was boring.  
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3mama5678

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Reply with quote  #42 
Last year: jazz group, ballet group, production, tap group, solo
This year: jazz group, ballet group, production, tap group, hip hop group, solo, duo
DD is 9
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LittleMonkeyMom

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Reply with quote  #43 
I think we are somewhere in the middle:

Last year - 5 dances (solo, duet, large group jazz, small group tap & production)
This year - 6 dances (solo, duet, large group jazz, large group contemporary, small group tap & production)

I don't think I'd ever go more than where we are this year - a couple of our competitions are smaller & 6 dances in one day is a LOT.
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emcandance

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Reply with quote  #44 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemykids
Just curious: competition fees must be close to the thousands of dollars per competition with over 10 dances! Especially with multiple solos and duos/trios. How many competitions do you do a year? And how can you afford it?! I must be in the wrong business for sure [rofl]
To answer the question last year she had 4, this year she has 6 and I find it steep!


Totally agree! I’m a school teacher and those numbers would cost me well over $1,000/month in tuition! Yikes!
DD is in in 5 this year, 6 last year. We opted for no solo this year so we could go to England.
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tappinmom

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Reply with quote  #45 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemykids
Just curious: competition fees must be close to the thousands of dollars per competition with over 10 dances! Especially with multiple solos and duos/trios. How many competitions do you do a year? And how can you afford it?! I must be in the wrong business for sure [rofl]
To answer the question last year she had 4, this year she has 6 and I find it steep!


The last year DS danced at the mega (14 years ago) solos were $100, duets and trios were $75 and groups were $45.  There were parents who took out loans and lines of credit to pay the $1000's just in comp fees.
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Jinkerbelle

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Reply with quote  #46 
DD 15 is in 9 this year. One production, one Super Line, two hip hop lines, two jazz lines, and lyrical line. Plus a duo and a solo.
Last year she was in 10. Plus she was doing her school dance team.
This year she is trying to focus on studio and technique and certain tricks more so she can try out for school team again next year.
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Jinkerbelle

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Reply with quote  #47 
Oh and for the reason why so many.... it was like this last year too when she was doing her school team and honestly we tried to cut back them as well.... last year she only tried out for 3 lines (same as this year) and production. However our studio places in lines 1-3 by age and ability with line 3 being most advanced or Elite. Well we thought we were cutting back last year by not trying out for tap or ballet line... so my daughter got placed in split lines. Meaning line 2 & 3 hip hop and lyrical. The rule is you have to do Line 2 if you are going to do Line 3. If you choose only one of the lines offered it has to be the lower line. I feel like it is kinda BS because these kids work soooo hard they wanna be line 3! The kinda gotcha by the dance balls because they know the kids will insist on doing Line 3. So this year is more of same with my daughter being straight Line 3 in lyrical and split in jazz and hip hop. However MANY kids have been split this year. More than I have ever seen and I don’t like it I think it is crap. Not ready to leave studio yet though! So don’t start! 😂
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Jacaranda

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Reply with quote  #48 
Quote:
Originally Posted by prancer
Adding more dances reaches a point of diminishing returns very quickly for me, so we only accept the best dances and keep the numbers low.

This year 4 (3 groups, one solo) 
Last year 3 (2 groups, one solo)

Not to hijack the thread, but if anyone wants to share their reasons for doing 8+ dances, I am curious to hear about the advantages that come from competing in a large number of dances. 








Here (QLD, Australia) it is totally normal to do tones of dancers. It's quite common for senior groups to do 15-16 dances or more. 8 or more is very common for the younger groups. Same with solos, it's common o do lots. I know of kids doing 10 solos at the age of 5!

Major difference between our comps and the ones in the US are

1. Cost. Our eisteddfods are generally run by not for profit organisations. The aim is to give kids performing arts experience, not to make money. Entry fees average about $5 to $8 for a solo. For groups about $10 to $20 for the while group not per dancers. So it works out to be around 50 cents to $1 entry fee per dancer, per group.

When it is like that it is actually a lot more cost effective to do more rather than less. If you are spending the day there, you may as well pay $40 and do 8 solos, rather than pay $5 and do 1.

2. Our comps tend to be much larger. Most of the ones we attend go for several weeks. Group routines are usually over the weekend and we usually have 4-7 days worth of group routines, while solos are usually during the week and can do from 10-20 days. People are used to the idea of doing lots, so we do lots.

3. We repeat routines. I have read many threads on here that indicate that repeating routines is not common in the US. Here it is very common. Recital routines will usually become comp routines the following year. It would be very rare to do a routine for less than 2-3 years and often the same routines are repeated for more than 10 years. Routines are often passed from age group to age group.

Last weekend at our recital, our mini comp team were performing one of their routines and all the kids in the studio knew it because it has been done since the 20 year olds were in it (at 7-8). When my kids started dance comps they competed against some routines that I competed against myself.

So since many routines are repeated it saves rehearsal time, new costumes etc.

4. We don't seem to spend as much time on routines as you do. Again I get the impression that in the US a lot of time is devoted to rehearsing each routine. People have indicated a certain amount of time is dedicated to each routine like 30 mins a week.

We just don't do that. Kids might have an hours rehearsal and run 10 different routines in that time. But from what I have seen on YouTube etc our kids routines are of good standards by comparison.

5. Comps are during school time often. Solos, duos and trios are almost always on school days so groups can be on the weekend. Groups are often on school days too if you have kids in the 6 years and under, 8 yrs and under or even 10 years and under groups. Theatres are more expensive to hire on the weekends, so the comps may only have them for a few weekend days. Senior groups get first priority for weekend times, because it is harder for them to miss school. So younger ones are often during school. If you are taking the day off school for comps, better to do it for 10 dances than 2.
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dmjrm4

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Reply with quote  #49 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacaranda
Here (QLD, Australia) it is totally normal to do tones of dancers. It's quite common for senior groups to do 15-16 dances or more. 8 or more is very common for the younger groups. Same with solos, it's common o do lots. I know of kids doing 10 solos at the age of 5! Major difference between our comps and the ones in the US are 1. Cost. Our eisteddfods are generally run by not for profit organisations. The aim is to give kids performing arts experience, not to make money. Entry fees average about $5 to $8 for a solo. For groups about $10 to $20 for the while group not per dancers. So it works out to be around 50 cents to $1 entry fee per dancer, per group. When it is like that it is actually a lot more cost effective to do more rather than less. If you are spending the day there, you may as well pay $40 and do 8 solos, rather than pay $5 and do 1. 2. Our comps tend to be much larger. Most of the ones we attend go for several weeks. Group routines are usually over the weekend and we usually have 4-7 days worth of group routines, while solos are usually during the week and can do from 10-20 days. People are used to the idea of doing lots, so we do lots. 3. We repeat routines. I have read many threads on here that indicate that repeating routines is not common in the US. Here it is very common. Recital routines will usually become comp routines the following year. It would be very rare to do a routine for less than 2-3 years and often the same routines are repeated for more than 10 years. Routines are often passed from age group to age group. Last weekend at our recital, our mini comp team were performing one of their routines and all the kids in the studio knew it because it has been done since the 20 year olds were in it (at 7-8). When my kids started dance comps they competed against some routines that I competed against myself. So since many routines are repeated it saves rehearsal time, new costumes etc. 4. We don't seem to spend as much time on routines as you do. Again I get the impression that in the US a lot of time is devoted to rehearsing each routine. People have indicated a certain amount of time is dedicated to each routine like 30 mins a week. We just don't do that. Kids might have an hours rehearsal and run 10 different routines in that time. But from what I have seen on YouTube etc our kids routines are of good standards by comparison. 5. Comps are during school time often. Solos, duos and trios are almost always on school days so groups can be on the weekend. Groups are often on school days too if you have kids in the 6 years and under, 8 yrs and under or even 10 years and under groups. Theatres are more expensive to hire on the weekends, so the comps may only have them for a few weekend days. Senior groups get first priority for weekend times, because it is harder for them to miss school. So younger ones are often during school. If you are taking the day off school for comps, better to do it for 10 dances than 2.


This is so fascinating.  Thank you for taking the time to educate us Jacaranda.


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melissa745

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Reply with quote  #50 
7 this year.
6 last year.

My dd already has plans to cut this number down a lot next year so she can start focusing more on ballet.
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