Register Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 2      1   2   Next
LivLaughLoveDance

High Bronze Member
Registered:
Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #1 
How do you know (if as a parent you have zippo experience with dance) if your child is born to be a dancer?  I mean legs, feet, etc.  What do they look for?  Do SO's know by looking at legs and feet at an early age if that child is born to dance?  Is it genetic?  



0
4boysmom

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,228
Reply with quote  #2 
I know that my son does not have a dancer's body, but his passion and drive make him a great little dancer. He works very hard at maximizing what he has, and that's all he can really do. I think teachers can tell if a dancer has a great body, legs, feet etc., especially for ballet, but it is hard work that gets the dancer where they need to be.
0
amandafarris03

Avatar / Picture

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 509
Reply with quote  #3 

my daughters leg shape wasn't made for dance (her muscle structure is though!) her knees knock together causeing her heels to not touch when she is standing with her knees together.  for her to get into first position she has to overlap part of her knee over the other.

0
gymmommy71

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,526
Reply with quote  #4 
For a girl - natural flexibility and hip turn out are a big sign. Feet that have a good natural arch when pointed where the toes can almost touch the ground. Coordination and balance that is superior to others the same age.

As far as body appearance - long legs and a short torso - ankles that are very tiny in comparison to knees - calves that are smaller than thighs. A longer neck looks good, and so do small wrists (which would probably be the case if the ankles are small).

These are just my opinions - I am not a professional [wink].
0
Jacaranda

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,108
Reply with quote  #5 
If your child has two legs they are born to dance!
0
Mom2Girls

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,605
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacaranda
If your child has two legs they are born to dance!


[smile] love this
0
JulieDB

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,348
Reply with quote  #7 
There is no one answer to this.  A person who does well at something like hip hop or tap may well not have the perfect body for ballet.  I do remember when my daughter was just starting out, her ballet teacher had them lie on the floor and raise their feet.  She grabbed one girl's foot and said to us all, "Now THAT'S a perfect ballet foot!"  No explaination as to why.  So it left every other kid in that class feeling inferior.

I also remember my daughter having a different teacher a few years later who was always getting after her for not having good feet.  She wasn't pointing her toes hard enough and wasn't going up high enough on releve.  So she worked on this.  And then?  When the recital pics came back from that year, everyone I know who was a dancer commented on how they could tell that she was a ballerina because of her feet.  I should also add that I think she could use her toes as a weapon.  She has put them on my thigh then pointed them, digging them into the flesh and causing a bruise.  Her toes are *very* strong.  So...  Even if one doesn't have the perfect feet (hers are wide and flat), one can work on improving them

OTOH, I have seen some kids try hard to improve their feet and they seemingly just can't!  Sometimes to the point where just watching them makes me want to look away.  Maybe they are sickling or they just can't seem to move them well.

And sometimes even when you think that a person has a good build for dance, they are not good at it!  I am remembering several years ago to a jazz class.  One of the girls was very thin and I guess I tend to assume that if a person has that sort of build, they will be super flexible.  But this girl?  Oh wow.  I am disabled and I can kick much higher than she could.  She struggled and struggled and told the teacher in tears that she didn't want to do the recital because she would going to look bad.  The teacher (who is also the SO) told her that she would make sure that she looked good.  And while she didn't give a stellar jazz performance, she also didn't stick out like a sore thumb like she often did in class.  But...  I also saw her in a hip hop piece and she was stellar in that class!

I know of another girl who was amazing in hip hop.  She was the type where when there were say 20 kids on stage, your eyes were drawn to her.  She did do all styles of dance and would upon looking at her have what I would think was a good build for dance.  Thin and flexible.  But...  Her interest was really only in hip hop.  She wound up leaving out studio and going elsewhere to be on a hip hop team.  I have seen her on TV and she was assisting a master class at our studio.

So you really just never know.  The main thing is that the interest has to be there.  If someone has the desire to dance, they will find a way to do it.  They might not succeed at all styles of dance but that's fine.  Few people succeed at everything.
0
JulieDB

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,348
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacaranda
If your child has two legs they are born to dance!


Actually that's not necessarily a requirement either.  I have seen some very nice performances from disabled people who didn't have both legs or only one leg.  Sometimes you have to think outside of the box.
0
rdsmom

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,498
Reply with quote  #9 
I wouldn't worry about it unless your dancer is a teenager and is interested in a professional career as a ballet dancer. He or she might have more difficulty getting a position in a company if he or she is too short, too tall, bad feet, etc., but otherwise, why does it matter? A DT is the only one qualified (and some of them are not so qualified) to make that decision. 
0
rdsmom

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,498
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdsmom
I wouldn't worry about it unless your dancer is a teenager and is interested in a professional career as a ballet dancer. He or she might have more difficulty getting a position in a company if he or she is too short, too tall, bad feet, etc., but otherwise, why does it matter? A DT is the only one qualified (and some of them are not so qualified) to make that decision. 

I checked your previous posts, and it looks like your DD is a little one. Don't worry about it then! 
0
jeanne4379

Avatar / Picture

Triple Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 17,938
Reply with quote  #11 
The thing is, you don't know if any child is born to be a dancer of any variety.  There are indicators like body type, feet et all, but they can never replace the look in the eye of the child that lets you know they'll make it - no matter what.  I've seen too many youngsters that even experts said No Way turn into beautiful ballerinas and succeed.  So much is a fluke of determination, dedication and white hot focus on a goal.  The reverse is also true, the child with natural musicality and ability goes into astro - physics instead.  The dream is either there for the dancer or it isn'st. 
0
Dancemomjus

Avatar / Picture

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 967
Reply with quote  #12 
i know i'm not experienced enough to a give a great answer but passion would be #1 i suppose and then perhaps natural ability. DD naturally has long legs and really good feet. But you'll also see maybe a "non" dancer body type who has the drive and fight to be a dancer. And i'd assume just like comp judges and acting roles everyone looking for someone pro will be looking for what they believe is the body type they want.
0
tappinmom

Avatar / Picture

Double Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 13,283
Reply with quote  #13 
Some kids are good at everything and some kids only have one discipline that they excel at even when they have a natural dancers body.  DS is tall and thin and has a perfect ballet/jazz/lyrical body.  His forte is tap with ballet a close second but his jazz/lyrical is seriously lacking.
0
Lexiluwho

Avatar / Picture

Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 253
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LivLaughLoveDance
How do you know (if as a parent you have zippo experience with dance) if your child is born to be a dancer?  I mean legs, feet, etc.  What do they look for?  Do SO's know by looking at legs and feet at an early age if that child is born to dance?  Is it genetic?  





I'm sorry and hopefully this doesn't come off wrong but this question struck me as odd. It's like asking how do you know your child is going to be a lawyer or doctor, you don't. As a parent it's our job to see a passion or interest and feed it the best we can even if it is not the passion we have for our child. Don't plan the future so far ahead because if you plan 20 years out and then they get hit by a car or the world ends or whatever, you've wasted all this time, energy and focus and didn't live for today. I would venture to guess that a good majority of professional dancers were once not thought to be "born" to dance. Hopefully that makes sense.
0
Kechara7881

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,245
Reply with quote  #15 
As for the "Feet" thing, most would never know but she is hopelessly flat footed. She has had to work really on her feet!
0
Momof3

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,258
Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kechara7881
As for the "Feet" thing, most would never know but she is hopelessly flat footed. She has had to work really on her feet!


This is encouraging, because my youngest, who is becoming more and more obsessed with dance as time goes by, is also ridiculously flat footed. Not that anyone's ever said anything about it - she's not even quite 7 yet! - but it's always been in the back of my mind that it's going to be a real obstacle for her to overcome if she decides she wants to stick with this.
0
lovetowatch

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 150
Reply with quote  #17 
It depends on what type of flat footed.  My dd is medically diagnosed flat footed.  When she stands flat, there is no arch.  But her feet are actually very flexible and so they point very nicely and she looks great in pointe shoes.  She is considered to have "great feet" but technically she has flat feet.
0
Momof3

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,258
Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovetowatch
It depends on what type of flat footed.  My dd is medically diagnosed flat footed.  When she stands flat, there is no arch.  But her feet are actually very flexible and so they point very nicely and she looks great in pointe shoes.  She is considered to have "great feet" but technically she has flat feet.


That's interesting - I didn't realize there were variations. Like I said, I'm not overly concerned because she's little, and who knows - she may decide basketball is her thing next year! But it's gotten more noticeable lately. She has no arch that I can see, which makes her ankles look like they're rolling in when she stands normally. She was wearing sandals with a little bit of a heel the other day, and it looked like she was going to break her ankles. But one of the older girls did comment a while back that DD's feet are very flexible, so who knows, maybe it won't matter!

Ok, done with the thread hijack now - Sorry!
0
beachgirl

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,476
Reply with quote  #19 
It's hard to tell and you never know......kind of like the old Hollywood tale when Fred Astaire auditioned in his late 20s/early 30s and the screen test notes were rumored to have said, "Can't act. Can't sing. Can dance a little."
0
my2miracles

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,173
Reply with quote  #20 
I don't think you can just know and it does make a difference what type of dance.  We have a couple of girls at our studio who are amazing tap dancers.  While they aren't heavy by any means, I would say they have thicker butts and thighs than other dancers at our studio do.  It works well for the type of tap they do.

We have girls who are super bendy, which make the acro & tricks their forte.  On the other hand, dd who isn't as bendy does better than them at ballet because she has the posture and body control of a ballerina.

My step daughters don't have dancer bodies at all.  They are built kind of square and are a bit on the heavy side.  They both have done well with dance though.  The youngest is 15 and the team dances she is on win competitions.  She knows she can't be a professional dancer but plans to go to school for choreography.  The oldest is 19 and is now a theater major in college.
0
heromom

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,423
Reply with quote  #21 
If they love it and are willing to work hard!

 I like this quote

"Hard work beats talent
When talent doesn't work"
0
Kechara7881

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,245
Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heromom
If they love it and are willing to work hard!

 I like this quote

"Hard work beats talent
When talent doesn't work"


Love this
0
Kechara7881

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,245
Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momof3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kechara7881
As for the "Feet" thing, most would never know but she is hopelessly flat footed. She has had to work really on her feet!


This is encouraging, because my youngest, who is becoming more and more obsessed with dance as time goes by, is also ridiculously flat footed. Not that anyone's ever said anything about it - she's not even quite 7 yet! - but it's always been in the back of my mind that it's going to be a real obstacle for her to overcome if she decides she wants to stick with this.


When DD stands, she has no arch. She spends a lot of time working on stretching her feet and has done so for years. It has been a long process but you can definitely see the results!
0
kmpmom

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,112
Reply with quote  #24 
If you had 10 dancers of various body types walk out on a stage and just stand there, most eyes would probably go to the tall, slim, long legged, long armed girl and assume she's the best dancer.  But why?  Our minds make assumptions no matter how hard we try, and if a dancer is hoping to work in the professional world, they'll be up against that stigma for the foreseeable future.  What I LOVE LOVE LOVE though is how many kids of all kinds of body types we've seen on stage over the last few years.  Yeah, Yeah, Yeah!  Come one, come all.  Help us all break that stereotype of what a "dancer" should look like. We were up against one of the top studios in the country a few weeks ago and they had two girls who if you passed them on the street you would NEVER think they were dancers.  OMG could those girls rock the stage!  All genres!  Loved it!  

So don't worry about what she looks like.  Let's work to make that unimportant.
0
Psmom

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 5,790
Reply with quote  #25 
All of the answers so far have been about physical qualities. Other than height, all of those things can be worked on if the dancer has the drive and internal motivation to do so. The bigger issue to me is an innate sense of rhythm. Those who have that definitely have a leg up on those who don't. You can teach someone to count the steps and set it to the music but it'll never be the same as the dancer who feels the rhythm and can dance to the beat without any thought at all.
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.