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Julzso

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Reply with quote  #1 
Hello,

My name is Juli and I am mom to Naomi, 9 years old.  We're from Brooklyn, NY and are new to this stage of dancing.  My daughter was a recreational dancer beginning at 3 years old.  About 2 years ago she began voicing an interest in professional dancing as a career and doing so as a child.  I answered all of her questions, but didn't take her seriously until about 9 months ago after her insistence continued and a push from a dance teacher.  Since the top of the year, she has auditioned and been accepted in a pre-professional program, has gone to a few conventions, and has mastered the art of master classes and drop ins [smile].  She's loving her new dance life and is excited to begin training at a higher level and delving into commercial dance at the same time.  This commitment is a lot of work, but also exciting and fun.  I look forward to this journey and having support from a group such as this.

Sincerely,
Juli
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joriebelle

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Reply with quote  #2 
Welcome to the group, Juli.  [smile]  You'll find lots of great info here.  I'm from the western suburbs of Chicago.
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dmjrm4

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Reply with quote  #3 
Greetings from the mid-West.  This Board is a wonderful information source.  I have learned so much!  My DD eats, sleeps and breathes dance, so it is on my mind all the time.  I love checking in here!
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Beccasmom

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Reply with quote  #4 
Welcome from just outside of NYC in northern NJ.
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JojosDanceMom

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Reply with quote  #5 
Welcome!  I'm from RI, although my DD is now a New Yorker because she just started attending college in the city for dance!
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My2DanceLoves

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Reply with quote  #6 
And all by the age of 9.   Impressive for sure.    Welcome.
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #7 


Welcome from Massachusetts!  I'm honestly a bit fascinated.  Never ever met a kid like this in real life... not in any of the studios my dd has attended.  And that's been quite a lot of studios over quite a number of years.  Seems to be only something I hear about on message boards.

Looking forward to sharing in your journey.   
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Julzso

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Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JojosDanceMom
Welcome!  I'm from RI, although my DD is now a New Yorker because she just started attending college in the city for dance!



Thank you for the welcome- congratulations to your daughter.  I hope she's enjoying NYC [biggrin]!

Juli
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Julzso

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thank you all for the warm welcome.  I was surprised to find this website and to learn of others like this.  I'm enjoying reading and learning from the plethora of families on the board.  Everyone's stories and perspectives are unique, but yet seem to be traveling down a similar road.  I'm most intrigued by the older dancers that have been dancing since they were young.  To continue to be motivated is admirable and I hope my girl will continue her love for dance even as is gets more demanding.  Thank you again and wishing everyone the best on their journey.

Juli
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Julzso

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidi459


Welcome from Massachusetts!  I'm honestly a bit fascinated.  Never ever met a kid like this in real life... not in any of the studios my dd has attended.  And that's been quite a lot of studios over quite a number of years.  Seems to be only something I hear about on message boards.

Looking forward to sharing in your journey.   


Thank you for your welcome.  I'm fascinated by your fascination.  I'm assuming you're pretty seasoned by your response and can't wait to learn from experienced families.  I wonder if what you're reading into in my introduction is geographical.  I've learned that LA is big for commercial dancers and there are many outlets and opportunities.  While NYC doesn't have the commercial visibility, I wonder if it's the access that has piqued your interest/curiosity.  There are so many dance schools in the boroughs which brings the ability to seek out whatever a family is most interested in pursing from local neighborhood schools, competition schools, competition teams that are not attached to a school or studio, commercial studios, to prestigious learning institutions.  When notable choreographers come to town they'll teach at certain studios, so those classes are a treat.  Drop in classes are plenty, so maybe region also determines access regardless of a child's aspirations or skill level.  BTW, my daughter is dying to get to LA for a "dance" visit [cool], lol.

Juli
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dancermom128

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Reply with quote  #11 
I have to ask...how exactly does one master the art of master classes? And at 9 no less, how incredible!
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Julzso

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dancermom128
I have to ask...how exactly does one master the art of master classes? And at 9 no less, how incredible!


I re-read that line and can see how that would read funny.  That was my attempt at a little humor.  What I meant by that is the ability to adapt quickly, to learn a new combination and adjust to that choreography and choreographer.  When we were at our neighborhood school it was what was to be expected.  A comfort level in the predictability and I don't mean that in a negative way.  Master classes has helped dd learn new choreography quickly and the ability to navigate a social environment that is much more competitive.  Some of these classes are geared towards children and some have older dancers to adults with a splattering of experienced young dancers.  Her first master class was with Matt Steffanina and afterward, Dave Scott. Since then she has continued to want to attend masters and drop ins for the variety.  We're fortunate to be able to do this on almost any given day and it has helped her tremendously.
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dancermom128

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Reply with quote  #13 
Wow, these master classes sound really intriguing. Imagine 9 year olds intermingled with adults! How cool!
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julzso


Thank you for your welcome.  I'm fascinated by your fascination.  I'm assuming you're pretty seasoned by your response and can't wait to learn from experienced families.  I wonder if what you're reading into in my introduction is geographical.  I've learned that LA is big for commercial dancers and there are many outlets and opportunities.  While NYC doesn't have the commercial visibility, I wonder if it's the access that has piqued your interest/curiosity.  There are so many dance schools in the boroughs which brings the ability to seek out whatever a family is most interested in pursing from local neighborhood schools, competition schools, competition teams that are not attached to a school or studio, commercial studios, to prestigious learning institutions.  When notable choreographers come to town they'll teach at certain studios, so those classes are a treat.  Drop in classes are plenty, so maybe region also determines access regardless of a child's aspirations or skill level.  BTW, my daughter is dying to get to LA for a "dance" visit [cool], lol.

Juli


Oh no.  None of that.  Just fascinated by the idea of such little kids with such big plans. And parents who make the choice to take them so seriously. It's not my reality.  Nor the reality of anyone I know in real life.  Eight or nine is what... 2nd or 3rd grade?  That's a baby in my eyes.
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My2DanceLoves

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Reply with quote  #15 
So Julz (may I call you Julz?) Are you by chance a studio owner?
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Julzso

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by My2DanceLoves
So Julz (may I call you Julz?) Are you by chance a studio owner?


Hi,

Julz is fine.  No, I'm not a studio owner.
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Julzso

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidi459


Oh no.  None of that.  Just fascinated by the idea of such little kids with such big plans. And parents who make the choice to take them so seriously. It's not my reality.  Nor the reality of anyone I know in real life.  Eight or nine is what... 2nd or 3rd grade?  That's a baby in my eyes.


Oh, I get what you're saying...While I can't speak for the choices other parents make, the one thing I do believe is that it's all subjective and there are many variables involved in those decisions.  For me, I had a kid who kept voicing her wishes.  Who would practice at home constantly; dancing and stretching.  We took gymnastics and this kid would be outside trying to perfect whatever she learned and incorporate it in dance.  I mean really driven without a word from me. 

In the grand scheme of things, yes 8/9 is young if you compare it to say a teenager or even a tween.  When looking at grade level, that's geographical.  My daughter is in 5th grade and will turn 10 in December.  I can't believe my baby, literally and figuratively, will be in middle school next year. 

Making the choice to take a child's passion seriously might depend on a few things other than the negative stereotype of the stage parent.  Say my kid loved soccer and played in a non-competitive environment and then wanted to play on a competitive traveling team and envisioned herself a professional soccer player.  Would I, or one not engage it? 

With hypothetical situations aside, I'll say that for me visual and performing arts are all around me.  I know kids who do many artistic things that land them in great places and their intention is not to go professional.  And when they do want it, it's easily accessible.  I don't have to go far to know, or know of young kids who dance for professional sports teams, kids who perform on Broadway, kids who land roles in movies that are from local dance schools.  Even if you dance recreationally, it could still lead to a performance at a venue, a local festival, etc.  When kids have access to so much theater and performing arts, you can't help but be immersed in the possibility.  Some children will say, "mommy I want to do that" and it's so easy here.  Not in terms of landing anything, but the fun in trying different things.  This doesn't only apply to performing arts, but lots that would be considered out of the box, or interests that kids usually wouldn't have access to.  And possibly my situation is different than the mom who uproots a family because an 8 year old says they want to be a star.  For me and some people I know it is a reality and you'd be surprised at how conservative some of us actually are [smile].
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julzso


Oh, I get what you're saying...While I can't speak for the choices other parents make, the one thing I do believe is that it's all subjective and there are many variables involved in those decisions.  For me, I had a kid who kept voicing her wishes.  Who would practice at home constantly; dancing and stretching.  We took gymnastics and this kid would be outside trying to perfect whatever she learned and incorporate it in dance.  I mean really driven without a word from me. 

In the grand scheme of things, yes 8/9 is young if you compare it to say a teenager or even a tween.  When looking at grade level, that's geographical.  My daughter is in 5th grade and will turn 10 in December.  I can't believe my baby, literally and figuratively, will be in middle school next year. 

Making the choice to take a child's passion seriously might depend on a few things other than the negative stereotype of the stage parent.  Say my kid loved soccer and played in a non-competitive environment and then wanted to play on a competitive traveling team and envisioned herself a professional soccer player.  Would I, or one not engage it? 

With hypothetical situations aside, I'll say that for me visual and performing arts are all around me.  I know kids who do Smany artistic things that land them in great places and their intention is not to go professional.  And when they do want it, it's easily accessible.  I don't have to go far to know, or know of young kids who dance for professional sports teams, kids who perform on Broadway, kids who land roles in movies that are from local dance schools.  Even if you dance recreationally, it could still lead to a performance at a venue, a local festival, etc.  When kids have access to so much theater and performing arts, you can't help but be immersed in the possibility.  Some children will say, "mommy I want to do that" and it's so easy here.  Not in terms of landing anything, but the fun in trying different things.  This doesn't only apply to performing arts, but lots that would be considered out of the box, or interests that kids usually wouldn't have access to.  And possibly my situation is different than the mom who uproots a family because an 8 year old says they want to be a star.  For me and some people I know it is a reality and you'd be surprised at how conservative some of us actually are [smile].


Oh no....you're reading way more into my words than is intended.  Making too many assumptions.  And they're taking you down the wrong path. I just really do not know parents of really little kids w/this "we're putting the pedal to the metal because little Suzie says she wants to be a star" attitude.  And I'm not some backwoods Missy living in the middle of nowhere.  It's just not what people I know do.  Even the crazy sports parents. They are fully invested, yes, but they don't typically try to suggest that they do it because "little Johnny" has some overwhelming passion for it & just begs to do more more more.  In my experience they are pretty honest & will tell you that part of why they do it is because "they" have a passion for it.  And/or are entertaining a fantasy of little Johnny earning a scholarship to college or going professional.  And if little Johnny likes it and is good... heck, why not? IDK. I've just found a very interesting world of dance on internet message boards (and reality tv).  A world that is very different than the one I've personally experienced.  And, yeah, I do find it kind of fascinating.
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dancermom128

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Reply with quote  #19 
I think you're assuming that most of us don't know what goes on in NY. Some of us have kids in college there, live there, have trained there. We're well aware of the opportunities that exist in NYC. 
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DanceMomLaura

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Reply with quote  #20 
Hello from Massachusetts.  Interesting intro thread. 

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beachgirl

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Reply with quote  #21 
Welcome! Is the pre-professional program your DD in a ballet program or a pre-professional competition program? I know that term is used interchangeably sometimes on these boards and with her interest in commercial dance I was wondering which path she is taking? Our studio could be lumped into "pre-professional" but we don't call our program that. We are a competition studio but prepare dancers for the commercial dance industry. We train heavily in ballet, but our dancers don't usually go into ballet companies.
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #22 
I'm also fascinated by competition teams that are not attached to a school or studio. Where would I find such a team?  I've never ever heard of that.
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dancedaughters

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Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julzso


Oh, I get what you're saying...While I can't speak for the choices other parents make, the one thing I do believe is that it's all subjective and there are many variables involved in those decisions.  For me, I had a kid who kept voicing her wishes.  Who would practice at home constantly; dancing and stretching.  We took gymnastics and this kid would be outside trying to perfect whatever she learned and incorporate it in dance.  I mean really driven without a word from me. 

In the grand scheme of things, yes 8/9 is young if you compare it to say a teenager or even a tween.  When looking at grade level, that's geographical.  My daughter is in 5th grade and will turn 10 in December.  I can't believe my baby, literally and figuratively, will be in middle school next year. 

Making the choice to take a child's passion seriously might depend on a few things other than the negative stereotype of the stage parent.  Say my kid loved soccer and played in a non-competitive environment and then wanted to play on a competitive traveling team and envisioned herself a professional soccer player.  Would I, or one not engage it? 

With hypothetical situations aside, I'll say that for me visual and performing arts are all around me.  I know kids who do many artistic things that land them in great places and their intention is not to go professional.  And when they do want it, it's easily accessible.  I don't have to go far to know, or know of young kids who dance for professional sports teams, kids who perform on Broadway, kids who land roles in movies that are from local dance schools.  Even if you dance recreationally, it could still lead to a performance at a venue, a local festival, etc.  When kids have access to so much theater and performing arts, you can't help but be immersed in the possibility.  Some children will say, "mommy I want to do that" and it's so easy here.  Not in terms of landing anything, but the fun in trying different things.  This doesn't only apply to performing arts, but lots that would be considered out of the box, or interests that kids usually wouldn't have access to.  And possibly my situation is different than the mom who uproots a family because an 8 year old says they want to be a star.  For me and some people I know it is a reality and you'd be surprised at how conservative some of us actually are [smile].


I know you are not asking for advice, but it's the nature of internet boards that you'll end up getting some anyway, so take this for what it's worth.  I have a kid who had a passion for performing arts from very early on, and who was able to do a small amount of professional work as a child.  She probably could have done more if we had decided to pursue it in a different way - you never know for sure but I've seen comparable kids and how it has played out for them.  My kid is in college now, and still hoping to work professionally as a performer as an adult.  My advice is this:

1. Be sure to distinguish between the value of training and building skills vs. the value of working professionally as a child.  They overlap but they are not the same thing.  Some professional jobs will be good learning/training experiences or just good life experiences.  Some will not.  The ones that are not will help "build a resume" but your child professional resume will not mean much when you are an adult, so don't get caught up doing things your child doesn't enjoy and doesn't learn from, or things that overextend your family, if the only value you see in them is building the resume.

2. You will be able to help your child in many ways, and you'll meet lots of other people who can help.  You can do the agent/manager thing for yourself, up to a point, or you can get someone else.  You can coach your kid for auditions, or you can hire someone.  The one thing nobody else can do is be your kid's parent.  Your #1 job is to look out for the well-being of your kid, because nobody else has that as their top priority.  We worked with great people who were wonderful with kids.  Many (maybe most) people in the business who work with kids are very good with them and very nice people.  But they have lots of other priorities and responsibilities.  Be the mom.  Make sure your kid is getting enough sleep, having fun, living a balanced life, having some space to make mistakes and learn from them.  Professional work can be part of this life, but it has to be just a part of it, not the thing around which everything else revolves.  

Note that I'm trying to tell you about these things not because I think you are on a bad path, but because you are at the beginning of a path with a lot of twists and turns and forks, and it can be nice to think ahead about what's out there.
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tendumom

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Reply with quote  #24 
Welcome! I have an older dancer who trained in Manhattan but is now living elsewhere in pursuit of her dream.

Ugh... Don't know what happened to the rest of my post.

I will cut to the chase because I am too lazy to rewrite the remainder of my post at the moment. . I am sometimes asked where younger dancers can take open classes. In our experience, dancers had to be about 12 and up for open classes, at least in Manhattan. I would love suggestions for younger dancers, even in other boroughs, particularly for the 9-12 year old age group. Thanks!
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Mom2Girls

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Reply with quote  #25 
Welcome Julzso! I'm in NY, too, but upstate. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1tinydancer
Wow! 9? My dd is 15 and hasn't accomplished crap. Unless you count getting on my nerves? Then she's an expert.


Well, we all know there's something really special about age 9. Maybe you should start again but this time try harder?
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