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dance010

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Hello dance Moms [smile] I currently have a 19 year old DD (just turned 19) that graduated c/o 2016. She tried the college thing, studying regular academics, and it was definitely not her thing. In her words she "quit college", lol. So here we are, almost a year after she graduated. She continued to dance at her new studio she started a year ago which is VERY heavy on technique. She has improved so so much since switching. She wants to dance professionally, but i am just wondering if anyone has any experience staying at your home studio/competitive studio after HS? Her team goes until 19 years old and this year she is competing under 18, so she technically has one more year left. She is going to an SI this summer as well. Just wondering if anyone has any experience with the "non traditional" way of doing things in the dance world or for kids who aren't ready to move away for college at 18 years old. Thank you!
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Jacaranda

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Here where we live, this is the norm. Most kids continue to dance at their studios well after they finish high school. Going away to college is not how things are usually done in Australia. The kids will usually attend a local university and continue to live at home and continue to dance and compete for their home studios until life takes them in another direction. It is wonderful because their maturity and experience can be a great learning tool for younger dancers. I was still taking lessons and competing for my dance studio at 27 years of age.

Perhaps it won't work at her current studio because they compete in an under 18's division. I am sure most studios would have their older dancers compete in an open age division so maybe you just need to seek out a different studio. It would seem to me like it would be in the studios best interest to keep her on, because then other kids who graduate high school and don't go to college right away would see that it was an option for them too. Losing seniors is hard for dance studios as many of them take a number of classes, so it is quite a loss of income. At our dance studio they complain that it can take 4-5 little ones to make up for the tuition lost from one senior student.

It is very common for dance studios in our area to offer a full time dance year or two for students for after they graduate high school. So the kids graduate and then study at their studio full time and get a vocational qualification in dance. I don't tkmow if this is done anywhere around you but it is a great path to the professional world.

Perhaps if she can't compete on team she can compete indempendently as a soloist, this way she will continue to get the stage experience she needs.
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dance010

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Jacaranda- Thank you so much for your informative reply!! Things in Australia work so differently. I love how you guys offer years after HS to get the stage experience, how great! Competing independently is something I haven't thought of yet, not a bad idea though after her next year. Adult categories are not common though, at least at the competitions we have been to for years. Rarely do we see an adult soloist. Finding a studio to compete under that offers adult comp might be difficult as it is almost unheard of (as far as I know) in California where we are.

As for the vocational qualification in dance, how awesome is that!! Don't think I have heard of that anywhere around here either, looks like we might be moving get to Australia next!![wink]
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tiptoemom

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I think most (not all) classical ballet dancers will skip traditional college and go right in to the trainee/apprentice/2nd company routne. (that being said, we know a few classical ballet dancers who are pursuing ballet at Indiana and Butler and their programs seem rigorous and do lead to company positions...it's another route). That being said, most dancers we know who are interested in contemporary/modern companies pursue a BFA in modern through a college. My daughter does know one dancer in her Youth Ensemble who was asked to apprentice, but apparently, this is not the usual route in to the company. They tend to prefer dancers who have gone through a BFA program. Someone will be along who will know someone who has succeeded by training at a high level and going straight in to a contemporary/modern company without the BFA, but I believe that will be the exception. 

All of that to say, what is your daughter's goal? Contemporary/Modern company? Broadway? Cruise ship? I think her answer will help people to give answers or suggestions. My daughter never danced at a competition school, so I don't understand how that will progress her to move to being a professional? I'd think she would need intense training and then go the audition route. Can you give more information?
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Jacaranda

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Reply with quote  #5 
Surely she doesn't need to go in an adult division, the eldest division would be something like "open age" of 15 and over etc,

My eldest DD is in Univeristy (1st year) and she dances at her studio just as she did in high school.
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dancemonkey

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Reply with quote  #6 
Your daughter might want to look into the year round training program at Joffrey in NYC. They have different divisions. As for competing after high school I'm not sure what the end would be. There really is no benefit at that point other than paying to perform and getting adjudicated.
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Beccasmom

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacaranda
Surely she doesn't need to go in an adult division, the eldest division would be something like "open age" of 15 and over etc, My eldest DD is in Univeristy (1st year) and she dances at her studio just as she did in high school.
=

In the US, most competitions go up until age 19 (for example, Starbound does 17-19 year as the "super senior" category, after that you would be considered an adult. Beyond the Stars considers ages 16-20 to be seniors. )

Having said that, I agree with tiptoemom that it would depend on what type of dance she wants to do.
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #8 
I understand that you're happy with the training offered at her current studio but, fwiw, if it were my dd I'd want her to move out of that environment.  Move to a 'next step' if you will.  Be surrounded by same age peers all working feverishly towards the same goal.  And a traditional studio for the 3-19 crowd doesn't typically offer that for an 18/19 yo. There are intensive post HS training programs for dancers who aren't interested in traditional college. Peridance in nyc offers a 2 yr certificate program.  Broadway Dance Center offers a professional semester program & STEPS offers a 2 yr conservatory... although those two are also in nyc.  With a quick google I found Millennium Dance Complex in LA which offers a certificate program.  I'm sure there are many others... just a matter of doing your homework.  My own dd wants to dance professionally but isn't looking towards traditional college either so I get it.   And, although it goes against the grain, I'm 100% behind her.  For dd, since she's interested in ballet first, the hope is to get into a trainee program right out of HS but if she was looking to pursue commercial dance right out of the gate I'd definitely be encouraging her to look into one of the certificate/conservatory programs in nyc.

Also... I'm with the pp who said that at this stage of the game competition is probably not going to be much more than an extra... unnecessary... expense.  Ongoing top notch training is expensive.  I'd encourage you to make sure you are getting long term value out of every single dollar spent.      

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emmymom

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Quote:
Originally Posted by heidi459
I understand that you're happy with the training offered at her current studio but, fwiw, if it were my dd I'd want her to move out of that environment.  Move to a 'next step' if you will.  Be surrounded by people who are working feverishly towards the same goal.... surrounded by people she could  look up to.  And a traditional studio for the 3-19 crowd doesn't typically offer that for an 18/19 yo. There are intensive post HS training programs for dancers who aren't interested in traditional college. Peridance in nyc offers a 2 yr certificate program.  Broadway Dance Center offers a professional semester program & STEPS offers a 2 yr conservatory... although those two are also in nyc.  With a quick google I found Millennium Dance Complex in LA which offers a certificate program.  I'm sure there are many others... just a matter of doing your homework.  My own dd wants to dance professionally but isn't looking towards traditional college either so I get it.   And, although it goes against the grain, I'm 100% behind her.  For dd, since she's interested in ballet first, the hope is to get into a trainee program right out of HS but if she was looking to pursue commercial dance right out of the gate I'd definitely be encouraging her to look into one of the certificate/conservatory programs in nyc.

Also... I'm with the pp who said that at this stage of the game competition is probably not going to be much more than an extra... unnecessary... expense.  Ongoing top notch training is expensive.  I'd encourage you to make sure you are getting long term value out of every single dollar spent.      



Yeah, I'm going to echo Heidi completely here.  She's always very wise and really has great advice!

I'm just going to add on that as good as DD's studio was/is, all of the dancers who wished/wish to pursue dance as a "career" leave after their senior year and the studio promotes it 100%.  Some attend college, others have set off for LA and NY and some have taken other avenues.  The SO/DTs don't profess to train dancers at that professional level and acknowledge that success in the competition world is far different than making it in the professional world. There are many avenues for getting where your DD is dreaming, I just don't think the local competition studio is going to be much help to her at this point either.
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tendumom

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Reply with quote  #10 
To dance professionally can mean many things. What does she see herself doing? And, moreover, how does she see herself getting the necessary training and exposure to get there? As has already been discussed, her home studio, no matter how better technically it is than her previous studio, is not going to get her there.  In addition to the various certificate programs mentioned above, there is also an Ailey certificate program. 

What sort of SI is she attending this summer? Could it lead to the next step in her training? 

And I do know a dancer who trained a local ballet school throughout her college years. This dancer had inadequate dance training and did not realize that until she was already in high school. She did attend college at the same time. She danced with high school students all through college. Eventually was able to find work as a ballet dancer overseas. 
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JulieDB

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Reply with quote  #11 
I would have to agree that the local studio probably won't help. Could be fun, but probably won't help. What kind of dance does she want to do? Ballet? Backup dancer for some band/singer? Local dance company? She could start auditioning.
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dance010

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Reply with quote  #12 
Thank you all for your responses!! DD wants to get into the more commercial type of dance. Backup dancer is also one of her dreams. Then again the other day she mentioned to me she wanted to be in a contemporary company. Definitely not ballet though, that is out of the question! The summer intensive she is attending is Joffrey Jazz and Contemporary in NYC. Thank you all for your input, It is so much appreciated!!
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