Register Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
dance010

Avatar / Picture

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 115
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello, I was reading up on the "When did your dancer start homeschooling" post and noticed a few of you all who mentioned that your dancer was homeschooling for college classes. Wondering if i could get some info from you who are thinking of doing this or already do do this for your kids. DD graduated last year (c/o 2016) and started at a local university for the second semester. She went for 2 weeks and had anxiety attacks and it did not feel right for her at all. She dances everyday and and thinking the homeschool option might be better for her so she is at least starting something here... we took the rest of the year off so i think getting back into a routine come fall would be good for her (she has no interest in school right now and i am slightly worried[confused]).

What was your situation with your dancer who didn't go away for college or did "homeschool" instead? How has it worked out?
1
DanceTumbleCheerMom

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 2,389
Reply with quote  #2 
There are several colleges that offer online degree programs.   I am getting ready to go back online to finish my degree through BYU.    Online classes can be great when it comes to time constraints or possible classroom anxiety. 
1
tendumom

Avatar / Picture

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,119
Reply with quote  #3 
Dd is in a program that only requires 16 credits to be earned on campus. The rest can be earned on line. Some classes are really just pre-recorded lectures. Some are small groups that meet on line. Some are are a combination.

You might want to check and see what online options her current school has, if any.

For DD, this is the most workable option to work on a degree and dance full time. She makes it work but has only been taking one class at a time this year. It will take her a long time, but she actually enjoys her classes and is lost when the semester is over!
1
amandafarris03

Avatar / Picture

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 513
Reply with quote  #4 
wouldn't that just be online college?  maybe "homeschool" college is high schoolers taking college courses for credit?
1
ballerinamom13

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,777
Reply with quote  #5 
DD is in the LEAP (Liberal Education for Arts Professionals) program for dancers at St. Mary's College in Moraga, CA.  Dancers provide a copy of their professional contract and receive a year of dance credits toward their Bachelor of Arts degree in Dance.  She is 4 classes in to her sophomore year, and as I said on the other thread, it's slow going.  She started with Kinesiology as her first class because she was in the process of getting certified to teach Pilates (mat and equipment) and she thought it would really help.  (She got an A[smile] - not bad for a difficult first college class.)  They are allowed to take electives at a community college and like tendumom's dd' s program, there are a number of credit classes that must be taken on campus, but they do not have to be present for the entire class.  It just so happens that my brother lives in Moraga, so when she needs to go, she has a free place to stay.  Every class she has had so far meets on line for 4 hours, one day a week.  All of them have been on Sunday evenings.  It was great, because the Company may have an afternoon show, but no Sunday night shows. One of her friends just graduated from the program this week-end. 

We researched other on-line college programs and there are many!  I think it probably depends what area you are in because I know some do require physical attendance at times.  We didn't do a lot of in-depth research because when we found out about the current program, we stopped looking.  I wish I had more info for you - we just started googling on-line colleges in her area and created a list.  Then her friend that just graduated told her about the program and we stopped searching.  It's a great way to get credits, but not have to deal with huge time constraints and I feel like it's not as strict about what classes kids choose -that probably depends on the program though.  I hope you can find one that interests your dd!!  Keep us posted.
1
dancermom128

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,619
Reply with quote  #6 
I've never heard of a homeschool college. College classes are taken through colleges. They can be taken online but they are through a college.
1
tendumom

Avatar / Picture

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,119
Reply with quote  #7 
I don't think there is, just an expression the original poster used. There were people in the homeschool community when DD started who said that an online school was not homeschooling. For someone coming from a traditional school, it sure seems like it, but for those making all their own choices, I can see why they might think that way.
0
dancermom128

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,619
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tendumom
I don't think there is, just an expression the original poster used. There were people in the homeschool community when DD started who said that an online school was not homeschooling. For someone coming from a traditional school, it sure seems like it, but for those making all their own choices, I can see why they might think that way.


Sorry I was referring to Amanda's post.
1
heidi459

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 5,922
Reply with quote  #9 
Online college is all the rage now and I can only expect that it will become more popular as more people look for more affordable ways to earn their degrees.  So many well respected colleges now offer online degrees and many (maybe most, maybe all... I have no way of knowing) do not differentiate.  In other words.. you won't come away with a bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska's Online College Program.  You will come away with a bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska.  Transcripts, etc... they don't generally come with a qualifier.  So if you fear someone snobby elitist will not take the degree seriously... well... have little to no fear.
1
PasDeChatMom

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 201
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by heidi459
Online college is all the rage now and I can only expect that it will become more popular as more people look for more affordable ways to earn their degrees.  So many well respected colleges now offer online degrees and many (maybe most, maybe all... I have no way of knowing) do not differentiate.  In other words.. you won't come away with a bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska's Online College Program.  You will come away with a bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska.  Transcripts, etc... they don't generally come with a qualifier.  So if you fear someone snobby elitist will not take the degree seriously... well... have little to no fear.


This....

I graduated from Arizona State University in 2010 (the old go back to college after having kids plan) and my degree program was entirely online. My degree is from ASU and looks just like my sister's degree, and she didn't attend a single class online. Additionally, we all got to walk across the stage and receive our degrees even though our program was online. It was a smallish degree program - I think 30 of us graduated that year - and it was great to finally meet each other in person. Our first time meeting was in our caps and gowns as we were lining up to walk in to the arena. [smile]
1
ggsmith

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 539
Reply with quote  #11 
Home schooling is big in my state.  The public schools are underfunded and over-regulated.  There aren't a lot of regulations for families who home school and people do it many different ways.  Our state and most of the counties have online schools that students can enroll in full time or part time.  A lot of families use the state or county virtual programs alone or in combination with other online, textbook based, and co-operative classes.  We can enroll our kids part time in the local school and create our own courses for the rest of the day and children have the right to participate in extra-curricular activities at their local school, like sports, if they are home schooled, enrolled in online school, or at a private school that does not have that sport.

Home schooling for college credit is a growing movement here where students are studying for different tests to obtain college credit before college.  For instance, students who study Spanish or American History as part of their home school curriculum using a college text book might take a CLEP or AP test.  Our state also allows high school students to dual enroll in a local community college and take classes that apply toward both their high school graduation and earn college credits that must be accepted by the public colleges in the state.  Home school students have to purchase their textbooks but each family is free to enter into an agreement with the local college providing the student passes the SAT, ACT, or PERT test with an acceptable score.  I think this is different than online college attendance.

Its amazing how many different paths there are through school these days.  My daughter hopes to complete an AA degree at the same time as her HS diploma.  She dreams of a dance career, but is aware that most dance jobs do not pay a living wage.  With an AA degree, she hopes to be able to continue dancing in college while getting a second degree to pay the bills, either while she pursues a dance career or, if she is lucky, after she finishes her career.

In the meantime she is getting excellent grades and is motivated to do school online year round.


1
JulieDB

Avatar / Picture

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,348
Reply with quote  #12 
My daughter's college is leaning more to online and hybrid classes. Hybrid means sometimes online but once in awhile they are required to go to class. In most cases she prefers the online. She just seems to do better with them. No distractions.
1
tendumom

Avatar / Picture

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,119
Reply with quote  #13 

As an aside to this topic, there are a growing number of dancers who complete their degrees at an older age because they attend college, one way or another, on a part time basis. Megan Fairchild of New York City Ballet, just completed her undergraduate degree at Fordham, 15 years after she began it (according to her Instagram post). 

I wish dd's university accepted dance credits! Some trainee type ballet programs have arrangements with local universities for credit (not the program dd just finished though). I love the idea of the program ballerinamom13's dd is in, giving credit for a full time professional contract. It's hard to balance dancing full time with doing anything else full time. Dd found it particularly hard in a trainee program as they danced full time during the day. Anything they did with the company was also during the day except performances and tech week, but anything they did with the academy (the company school) was at night, so her schedule was not always predictable. Hoping it will be a bit easier in the year to come as a professional. 

Age-wise, dd would have just finished her sophomore year, but has only just completed the equivalent of her freshman year in terms of credits, and that's just because she took 3 college classes while she was in high school. One issue to be aware of with taking college classes in high school is that not all colleges will accept college classes that were used to meet high school graduation requirements (ie no double dipping, the courses count for either high school or college, not both). As the other poster mentioned, this generally not an issue with state universities and colleges, but it can be with some private colleges and universities. 

1
dancer456

Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 469
Reply with quote  #14 
The double dipping thing is an issue with DD's public university in California. She did get college credits for her APs, but they do not accept credits that count towards her high school graduation. So when dd took at science class at community college when she was homeschooling, she did not use it towards her high school graduation requirements, so that she would be able to have it count in college. 
0
melissa745

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,464
Reply with quote  #15 
On the flip side, start college with too many credits and you're considered a transfer student which usually has a different set of admission requirements and often means you don't get to participate in the same orientation activities or live in the freshman dorms.
0
ggsmith

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 539
Reply with quote  #16 
The double dipping issue is solved with an AA degree, however, as Melissa points out, you aren't a freshman coming into college with an AA degree.  Definitely something to consider.  In our case, my calculations indicate this will be the best course for DD, but each family has to determine what works for them.
0
heidi459

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 5,922
Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ggsmith
The double dipping issue is solved with an AA degree, however, as Melissa points out, you aren't a freshman coming into college with an AA degree.  Definitely something to consider.  In our case, my calculations indicate this will be the best course for DD, but each family has to determine what works for them.


My personal experience has been that out of the box thinkers who consider these other options aren't typically all that interested in a "traditional" college experience... which is why they are willing to think out of the box in the first place.  It's an entirely different way of looking at college.  Less of an "experience" and more as a means to an end with the 'end' (the education/the degree) being all that matters .  Never say never but I don't expect that any of my 4 kids will be doing the traditional on campus 4 year thing.  Dd has already decided that part-time online is the way to go for her.  My oldest son (soon to be 16) has his eyes set on a duel Associates at a local community college with a transfer to a commutable state school for his Bachelor's (perhaps after or separated by a gap year with some sort of internship experience).  The other two are too young to really have any legitimate plans but they are listening/watching and seem to be adopting a similar attitude. They are fully aware that the bulk of the financial responsibility will fall on them... and they understand the long term consequences of that.  They aren't interested in racking up any more debt than they have to to get where it is that they want to go.
0
melissa745

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,464
Reply with quote  #18 
Being a freshman is more than just an experience. There are scholarships that are only available to freshman.

There is a lot to consider when you are making college plans, these days.
0
heidi459

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 5,922
Reply with quote  #19 

Quote:
Originally Posted by melissa745
Being a freshman is more than just an experience. There are scholarships that are only available to freshman. There is a lot to consider when you are making college plans, these days.


I wasn't referring to freshman year.. nor any single aspect of college.  I just meant in the bigger picture, as many do consider the totality of "the experience" (living away from home, the social aspects, etc) to be as important as the education itself (the coursework &, ultimately, the degree).   That said, so much of "how" you do college will influence the ultimate expense. Scholarships can be particularly important if you go the more traditional route, yes, but going non-traditional can save a boatload of money thereby making those scholarships less imperative (i.e.  Two years at a local community college can be 1/2 the cost of freshman year alone as a residential student... depending on where you go, of course.  And I've heard of students shaving off a year or more because of college credits earned in HS & during a subsequent gap year... which, again, just translates to money saved.  And the more expensive the college... the more the savings.  It's almost the equivalent of a scholarship w/o the hassle/anxiety of having to apply & hope for the best).

And absolutely, w/four kids ranging in age from 11 to 17, I know full well that there's a lot to consider.  It's nice that there are so many different paths to choose from though. As a pp stated... each family must choose what works for them.

0
rdsmom

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 3,502
Reply with quote  #20 
We are fortunate to live close to a few major universities-University of Minnesota included. DD 14 is going to go to the U of MN at least part time her junior year of HS, and full time her senior year of HS. Instead of getting AP credits, she'll have an actual college transcript from a large university with credits that are much more likely to transfer elsewhere. It's free as long as she doesn't graduate from HS early-she gets both HS and college credit. This will let her skip the HS gym requirement and take dance at the U instead and do the advanced math she's looking for. I know she'll miss out on some HS stuff because of this, but it's essentially like a 2 year scholarship. Also, if it's too much, she can easily go back to HS. She's one of those kids who prefers hanging out with older teens or adults because she doesn't like the drama of the kids her age, so I'm not very concerned about the social side of missing out on high school. We're hoping for a win-win here, especially if she can get in to MIT. The more transfer credits, the better!
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.