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LeapYear0208

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Reply with quote  #26 
My DD enjoyed the ballet classes at NYCDA and 24/7. She however did not like them at LADM. She is one of the comp kids that loves ballet, but she isn't ready to say ballet only. At all of the comps and conventions we have been to, it seems to be a common theme that they would rather see you do a clean single than any other amount of turns. A clean single will always win over a sloppy double. 
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dancermom128

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatball77
There is no pointe and the ballet isn't really ballet.  It's contemporary ballet to a pop song.  They aren't teaching variations or anything.



Actually that's not true everywhere. It's not always contemporary ballet to a pop song. NYCDA tends to be more classical.  Scott and Kenny definitely do not teach contemporary ballet. Chantel at NUVO teaches more of a contemporary ballet combination but not to a pop song. DD just had Richard at Radix and he definitely taught classical ballet. No variations (you certainly aren't learning something like that in 45-60 minutes) but not all contemporary ballet by any means.
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dave9988

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Reply with quote  #28 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancermom128


Actually that's not true everywhere. It's not always contemporary ballet to a pop song. NYCDA tends to be more classical.  Scott and Kenny definitely do not teach contemporary ballet. Chantel at NUVO teaches more of a contemporary ballet combination but not to a pop song. DD just had Richard at Radix and he definitely taught classical ballet. No variations (you certainly aren't learning something like that in 45-60 minutes) but not all contemporary ballet by any means.


I'd agree 100% regarding Scott (love his dry humor) & Chantel.  Francisco at 24/Seven is also classical. 

I've never seen dancers using chairs to assist with a "barre routine" at a convention.
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threegirlpileup

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Reply with quote  #29 
I think it really depends on the kid and your resources.  A bunch of girls from my dd's company went to Raddix last year (just to the convention, not to compete), but it wasn't worth the $$ to us--we decided we'd rather have the money pay for a few nights at the beach!  But she doesn't love the convention scene, with the huge classes often taught on carpet.  YMMV.
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2dornot2d

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by threegirlpileup
I think it really depends on the kid and your resources.  A bunch of girls from my dd's company went to Raddix last year (just to the convention, not to compete), but it wasn't worth the $$ to us--we decided we'd rather have the money pay for a few nights at the beach!  But she doesn't love the convention scene, with the huge classes often taught on carpet.  YMMV.


Radix was the least organized convention we attended last year. I'm not sure what city your girls attended, but ours wasn't as huge as Nuvo or NYCDA. We always do NYCDA, Nuvo, Jump, 24Seven and Adrenaline, and added Radix for the first time. SO decided not to do it again.
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608Mom

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Reply with quote  #31 
I have a comp kid who LOVES conventions, so we go often, and have tried many.  In my opinion, Tremaine is the one that values excellent ballet training.  We've been multiple years in different cities, and the audition always begins with a ballet combination.  Only those with the strongest ballet technique are invited to continue with a jazz or contemporary combination.  I think Tremaine would be the best value for a ballerina looking to experience a convention.

I'll also add that I think conventions have given my daughter lots of valuable experience.  Yes, by now she picks up choreography quicker than most, which is a tremendous skill.  But she recently got feedback from a new instructor that pleased me...she said that my daughter "treats every class like an audition".  She gives everything she has, every single day in every single class, even in her home studio.  I have to believe that would make a difference to any dancer in any genre - ballerina or otherwise.
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dncemom01

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Reply with quote  #32 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 608Mom
I have a comp kid who LOVES conventions, so we go often, and have tried many.  In my opinion, Tremaine is the one that values excellent ballet training.  We've been multiple years in different cities, and the audition always begins with a ballet combination.  Only those with the strongest ballet technique are invited to continue with a jazz or contemporary combination.  I think Tremaine would be the best value for a ballerina looking to experience a convention.

I'll also add that I think conventions have given my daughter lots of valuable experience.  Yes, by now she picks up choreography quicker than most, which is a tremendous skill.  But she recently got feedback from a new instructor that pleased me...she said that my daughter "treats every class like an audition".  She gives everything she has, every single day in every single class, even in her home studio.  I have to believe that would make a difference to any dancer in any genre - ballerina or otherwise.


NRG also starts the auditions with Ballet.
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prancer

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Reply with quote  #33 
So does NUVO.
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dancermom128

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Reply with quote  #34 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave9988


I'd agree 100% regarding Scott (love his dry humor) & Chantel.  Francisco at 24/Seven is also classical. 

I've never seen dancers using chairs to assist with a "barre routine" at a convention.


We've never been to one that uses chairs either. That would be a $hit show [rofl]
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #35 
Yeah... now that I think about it it was ADA Nationals where they had the dancers use chairs for a simple barre.  Makes sense that that wouldn't work at a typical convention which would be much more crowded. 
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prancer

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Reply with quote  #36 
Dancermom128 - we have been conventions with chairs used as barres - and it worked very well.  The students (even the little ones) were expected to get and return their chairs and line them up in straight columns for class. 
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dancerachael1

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Reply with quote  #37 
I grew up as a competition dancer, so when I switched to doing all ballet at Pacific Northwest Ballet School, it was a bit difficult. While my heart did lie with ballet, it was hard to give up the other styles of dance that I love too. As a result, I continued competing at my favorite competitions as an independent entry. Many of the independents in my area came together to form a studio and we now meet once a week to rehearse our group dances and solos. We are just now entering our third competition season and are planning on attending NYCDA, NUVO, 24 Seven, Jump, Art of Movement, and Revel. As you can tell, we are not doing a ton of competitions because of how much we all have going on in our lives. This allows me to continue my ballet training while still doing competition. My personal favorite competitions are NYCDA and NUVO because they really value ballet and proper technique there, so I highly suggest them for ballet dancers.
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BalletMom62567

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Reply with quote  #38 
I think  much of it depends on the dancer's personality. My DD is an introvert. Loves ballet, tap, and contemporary. She is not an attention seeker at all. She did one this past fall, and it was probably the last one she will do. She had fun dancing with her friends, but the classes were big and crowded. She found herself having to fight for space, and for her that's difficult. She was really looking forward to the ballet class bc that is her wheelhouse, but she grew frustrated because she couldn't get any space to do the combo. In some ways, it is good for her to dance in that environment bc she learns to be a little more aggressive, but she didn't really enjoy it. As for scores for competing her solo...we still haven't gotten them. Not sure if it is the convention or the studio that is to blame. I watched the ballet class she took at the convention and there were only a handful of kids there that showed any technique. The kids they "called out" weren't very strong except for 2 girls. 

I don't think it is worth the money because I don't think she actually learned anything but a handful of new combos. Not much feedback or direction in the classes except choreography. Some of the other kids in our group loved every second of it. Just not my child.
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