Register Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 2      1   2   Next
TinyDancerNJMom

Avatar / Picture

Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 55
Reply with quote  #1 
Love all the answers advice and support on here!

My DD9 just danced for the first time outside her studio's recitals and ballets at YAGP philly regionals.  She was one of two pre-comp dancers from our school and the other was 11 and just recently joined our studio from a competition studio (YAGP is the only competition that our studio does and is classical ballet focused)

The other dancer is great and placed top 12 at her first YAGP but is used to placing in other competitions she has done in the past.  Her mom is a lot more 'on it' than I am at this point and we have been chatting about other things she is looking into for her dancer.  While I know my DD is a few years behind hers I can't help but starting to wonder if I should be doing other things to support her goals.  Right now she thinks that dancing in a professional classical ballet company is something she would like to do (although I know that soooo much can change before then)

So LOONG story a bit shorter, the other mom is looking into taking her daughter to a convention independently of our studio.  For the classes and the chance to compete her solo.  From what I know about competitions (very little) it doesn't seem like my DD's LaBayadere variation would be appropriate to compete but she loves taking all the class she can get and I thought maybe it would be fun to take her.  The one she is talking about is ADE, artistic dance exchange which will be in a city only about 20 mins from us so travel and hotels wouldn't be a concern.  But DD is really focused on ballet (takes Jazz and Contemporary too) so tricksy acro or super sassy music video dances are not something she has any experience or interest in.  Also we really aren't interested in competitions, YAGP felt like its a different kind of thing.

Are conventions worth it just for the ballet and other dance classes? And general fun dance day? 

Thanks in advance for any feeback!
0
2dornot2d

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 516
Reply with quote  #2 
Top ballet schools in my area (Dallas TX) usually attend NYCDA as their top choice convention. Top level conventions always have great ballet teachers and the judges always appreciate ballet numbers. Nuvo, Jump, 24/seven are the ones she can take great classes from teachers like Travis Wall, Mandy Moore, etc.

I haven't heard of ADE convention here.
0
dave9988

Avatar / Picture

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 861
Reply with quote  #3 
A few random thoughts:

  • Not competing at conventions makes it easier to deal with consecutive long days.
  • Ballet-focused dancers might struggle in tap class, but jazz/hip hop/contemporary classes are useful; they teach you how to move your body in different ways and styles.
  • Learning a short combo quickly is a great skill to pick up.
  • Learning to dance a combo when you haven't rehearsed it for a month - you don't fully know it - is a great skill.  Learn to focus on making it your own, filling in *something* artistic for those little moments you don't recall, that's useful.
0
TinyDancerNJMom

Avatar / Picture

Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 55
Reply with quote  #4 
That's good feedback already, thank you! 

In the company ballet class she takes (where she is the youngest in the class) she has told me that picking up the more advanced combinations quickly is the thing she most struggles with so that is definitely good to hear.
0
momcrew

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 708
Reply with quote  #5 
I absolutely think a convention would be worth it for a ballet dancer. And I agree with dave, not competing makes a convention a million times easier and more enjoyable, IMO. BUT, if she wants to compete her solo then do it. Feedback is feedback and anytime you can get on that stage it makes you a stronger dancer. 
0
huckitvt

Avatar / Picture

High Bronze Member
Registered:
Posts: 29
Reply with quote  #6 
We love love love Caitlin Kinney at Hollywood Vibe
0
LilMama

High Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 168
Reply with quote  #7 
Don't just go for a certain ballet teacher though, classes can change last minute due to teacher's traveling. Our ballet class was cancelled at Nuvo.
0
dave9988

Avatar / Picture

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 861
Reply with quote  #8 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyDancerNJMom
That's good feedback already, thank you! 

In the company ballet class she takes (where she is the youngest in the class) she has told me that picking up the more advanced combinations quickly is the thing she most struggles with so that is definitely good to hear.


She'll get lots of practice at a convention.  That's not to say she won't struggle with it there, just that she'll have practice.  The first time especially can be frustrating and mentally draining.  Especially when you see others that seem to know the combo and pick things up easily.  Sometimes that's because those dancers pick things up easily.  Sometimes it's because those dancers saw the same combos three weeks before in another city.  So ... try to avoid too much focus on other dancers (yet another skill).
0
tendumom

Avatar / Picture

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,390
Reply with quote  #9 
My DD danced at a small pre pro school after leaving a comp school. We would go to a convention once a year for fun. She did The Pulse in Atlantic City a few times and Artists Simply Human in New Brunswick, NJ . (Guessing you are in NJ). As she got older, both summer intensive auditions and rehearsals got in the way of doing those. There was really little benefit to doing them other than fun and stepping out of the box for a bit. She was at a school where they had to learn to pick up choreography quickly, so that was not anything new. That's something that comes out of strong ballet classes naturally.

Keep your eyes on the prize. These extras are just that, extras. Strong, developmentally appropriate training is where it is at for longevity in this field. 😀
0
tiptoemom

Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 327
Reply with quote  #10 
I agree with @tendumom. Your daughter is 9. Real ballet starts around 7-8 years old. Even 9 and 10. Ballet is a slow boil. Quickly picking up combinations is all about appropriate training. It also helps if you are not at a school with defined technique (some like RAD do the same combos over and over again). I liked that my daughter had multiple teachers at her ballet school. That really mixed up center and across the floor. I would seek out master classes and auditions to expose her to different teachers and styles/methods. You have to really watch the teacher so you understand what they are asking you to do. 2 different teachers can ask for arms or head or hands in different ways. These are all things your young daughter will learn. Does she use her time waiting for center or diagonal to mark the combos and watch the other dancers? Does she keep a notebook and write down combos, corrections and observations? She is really young but it is a good habit to begin. Once she has a few years in she will understand that there are only certain combinations that will make sense. 
0
jackilvsmath

Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 55
Reply with quote  #11 
I have to say that my DD absolutely adores the ballet classes at conventions.  We were just at Dancemakers Indianapolis this last week and she LOVES LOVES LOVES the ballet teacher (Keith).  He has such a great message about dance and ballet (every ballet class you take is like putting money in your dance bank with learning skills and experience).  She took his teen ballet (age 11) and then also took the Advanced Ballet and Pointe on Sunday morning (for teens and seniors) and said it was HARD but that she felt like she learned so much.

She has also really enjoyed Francisco Gella with 24/7 and he also promotes a great message about working hard and experiencing everything that a dance class has to offer - that you don't have to be the best - it is about working and learning.


0
prancer

PREMIUM MEMBER
Registered:
Posts: 1,236
Reply with quote  #12 
Conventions are really fun for most dancers. But they are not necessary for any.
0
Cleo233

Novice Member
Registered:
Posts: 8
Reply with quote  #13 
We went to one large convention and I don't see the point unless your child wants to be a commercial dancer. I wouldn't go back. I would rather spend funds on ballet technique, learning variations, and saving for summer intensives. The elephant in the room for pre-pro ballet schools is that kids can't do a clean single pirouette for years at a slow boil school. The mini room is full of doubles and triples and it's had to explain to your dancer why they are so far "behind". They are different worlds each with positives and negatives, just have to figure out what is important to YOUR dancer.
0
TinyDancerNJMom

Avatar / Picture

Silver Member
Registered:
Posts: 55
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleo233
We went to one large convention and I don't see the point unless your child wants to be a commercial dancer. I wouldn't go back. I would rather spend funds on ballet technique, learning variations, and saving for summer intensives. The elephant in the room for pre-pro ballet schools is that kids can't do a clean single pirouette for years at a slow boil school. The mini room is full of doubles and triples and it's had to explain to your dancer why they are so far "behind". They are different worlds each with positives and negatives, just have to figure out what is important to YOUR dancer.


YES! This!! I was really proud of DD9's YAGP solo and I think her teacher chose it well for her to highlight things she does well, like leg extension (as in devellope not scorpion/tilt/heal stretch) but she seemed weak in things like her single and leap compared to the other dancers her age (or really a year or two older) and ESP. in the contemporary dancers there.  I know we aren't a comp studio and the focus is classical ballet technique which is what DD wants, but... 

It is so hard to see 6 year olds on Dance Moms and in competitions doing triples and leaps 5 feet off the ground and know my DD9 can't come close to that.  I try to remind myself that 'slow boil' training is set up for longevity of the dancer and injury prevention and all the logical answers but...
0
ballerinamom13

Avatar / Picture

PREMIUM MEMBER
Registered:
Posts: 1,880
Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyDancerNJMom


YES! This!! I was really proud of DD9's YAGP solo and I think her teacher chose it well for her to highlight things she does well, like leg extension (as in devellope not scorpion/tilt/heal stretch) but she seemed weak in things like her single and leap compared to the other dancers her age (or really a year or two older) and ESP. in the contemporary dancers there.  I know we aren't a comp studio and the focus is classical ballet technique which is what DD wants, but... 

It is so hard to see 6 year olds on Dance Moms and in competitions doing triples and leaps 5 feet off the ground and know my DD9 can't come close to that.  I try to remind myself that 'slow boil' training is set up for longevity of the dancer and injury prevention and all the logical answers but...


Hi TinyDancerNJMom - you seem like a great mom and your dd sounds like she is doing well. One of the best lessons I learned on my dd's 20 year journey from competition dancer to professional ballerina is, please stop caring what other people are doing and focus only on your child.  I wish I had learned this earlier - life would have been easier.  I mean this in the nicest way- it is counterproductive.  Just do what she needs and ignore everyone else.  

P.S. - especially don't make comparisons to anyone on Dance Moms, please. ugh.
0
tendumom

Avatar / Picture

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,390
Reply with quote  #16 

I'll echo ballerinamom13 and add a story I have told before. 

Dd was a student at an audition based ballet school near the end of her training. Her peers were almost entirely dancers who only attended ballet schools, mostly audition based schools at that. They had a very creative choreographer who did all sorts of interesting things. Dd came home one day marveling at what she called "competition tricks" being done by her fellow students who had never even tried a leg hold turn in their entire lives. It was a non-issue for these very well trained dancers. Quite different from an 8 or 9 year old who doesn't have the same maturity. 

And as far as leaps so high off the ground on TV, know that camera angles are everything! I just did a photo shoot with a professional dancer and he was blown away by his own height in the photos... photos that I took from across the room where I was either crouched low on the ground or actually outright laying down! Angles are everything! LOL

 

0
nyklane

Avatar / Picture

Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 282
Reply with quote  #17 
Just a note about what you’ll see. In conventions - most that we have been to discourage ACRO tricks during classes. You will see someone on the side doing a roundoff back handspring layout - and then the instuctor come in to the mike to tell them to stop. Even cartwheels. During the convention classes it is always discouraged - or outright stopped.

You will see doubles in choreo in the junior rooms for sure, but every instuctor tells dancers to do what they can and what looks good. Usually with a little speech before the move. [smile]

What my DD struggled with was picking up choreography and after we’ve done a set of conventions now - she is MUCH better at it in her home studio. Having sections of choreography to learn in each style by different teachers in short time periods has given her the “experience” to try it. She’s done it a lot of times now and it definitely has helped in her regular classes.

It’s a new experience. I would seek out the 1 day conventions (usually more reasonable cost) - with a variety of styles to choose from.

0
dave9988

Avatar / Picture

High Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 861
Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nyklane
JYou will see doubles in choreo in the junior rooms for sure, but every instuctor tells dancers to do what they can and what looks good. Usually with a little speech before the move. [smile]


Yes, I have heard that speech many, many times: "I'd rather see a *clean* single than a poor double or triple...."
0
gymanddance

Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,452
Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave9988


Yes, I have heard that speech many, many times: "I'd rather see a *clean* single than a poor double or triple...."


However, there are many kids at conventions that can do clean quads or more..... so a clean single may never be noticed. 

I think that you can't discount the comp world or the training that is provided. Many comp studios have great ballet these days and their kids are making it into top SI's and placing higher than ballet only kids at "ballet" comps.

Conventions can be helpful to dancers to help learn the skill of picking up choreo quickly. It can expose you to different genres of dance. Definitely worth checking out.

BTW this is coming from a dance mom whose dd was a comp dancer since age 4 and we moved to one of the nations top ballet schools at age 11. We are not doing any conventions this year, but I am very thankful for all they taught dd in the past.
0
heidi459

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 6,379
Reply with quote  #20 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gymanddance


However, there are many kids at conventions that can do clean quads or more..... so a clean single may never be noticed. 

I think that you can't discount the comp world or the training that is provided. Many comp studios have great ballet these days and their kids are making it into top SI's and placing higher than ballet only kids at "ballet" comps.

Conventions can be helpful to dancers to help learn the skill of picking up choreo quickly. It can expose you to different genres of dance. Definitely worth checking out.

BTW this is coming from a dance mom whose dd was a comp dancer since age 4 and we moved to one of the nations top ballet schools at age 11. We are not doing any conventions this year, but I am very thankful for all they taught dd in the past.

 

For whatever it's worth...I believe the comment about the single was not intended to put down comp kids &/or suggest there wouldn't be a clean multiple turn in the room but rather to reassure anyone who might fear their dancer would be sorely out of place if they could only do a clean single.  To let them know that faculty/judges do, in fact, notice & appreciate beautiful clean singles.   And it's true.  A lot of people in the industry are not a fan of this trend.  I hear/read about it a lot.  A couple of yrs ago when my then 16 yo was competing as an independent.... her lyric number at this one point had this very slow single pirouette.  And the judges, again & again throughout the season, would ooh & aaah over that pirouette on the critique & talk about how they wished more dancers would understand how they don't need to do multiple turns to impress them.  That that's not what it's all about.

All that said.. I agree that conventions can be great for ballet dancers looking to get out & move a little differently.  If it's something they'd like to do.  It's just another opportunity to dance.    

0
prancer

PREMIUM MEMBER
Registered:
Posts: 1,236
Reply with quote  #21 
The last convention I watched never choreographed more than a double in the teen room. I love to see a clean single or double with the dancer on their leg.
0
dancer456

Gold Member
Registered:
Posts: 469
Reply with quote  #22 
This may seem like a newbie question, but one of the reasons that I never had my dds (ballet trained, not at comp schools) attend a convention was that when I looked them up online or saw pictures, they all seemed to take place in carpeted hotel conference rooms, with like a small stage up front for the teacher or whatever, and I could not for the life of me figure out how you could have a proper ballet (or pointe!) class on carpet. Do I have the wrong idea completely and are there actual studios?
0
prancer

PREMIUM MEMBER
Registered:
Posts: 1,236
Reply with quote  #23 
I have never ever seen pointe as a convention class. The flooring usually is flat carpet, but they often use chairs as a barre and go across the floor.
0
heidi459

Avatar / Picture

Diamond Member
Registered:
Posts: 6,379
Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancer456
This may seem like a newbie question, but one of the reasons that I never had my dds (ballet trained, not at comp schools) attend a convention was that when I looked them up online or saw pictures, they all seemed to take place in carpeted hotel conference rooms, with like a small stage up front for the teacher or whatever, and I could not for the life of me figure out how you could have a proper ballet (or pointe!) class on carpet. Do I have the wrong idea completely and are there actual studios?


Fwiw they don't do pointe at these conventions.  And from what I've seen/know, more often than not there is a large wooden floor laid down in the center which accommodates most of the dancers during a barre set (using the back of a chair as a barre) and where they will do across the floor work/ combinations.
0
meatball77

Avatar / Picture

High Platinum Member
Registered:
Posts: 4,757
Reply with quote  #25 
There is no pointe and the ballet isn't really ballet.  It's contemporary ballet to a pop song.  They aren't teaching variations or anything.

0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.