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dirtchic

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Reply with quote  #26 
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Originally Posted by cynmckee
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Originally Posted by dirtchic
We switched from a larger studio that had 2-3 groups that did very well at competitions, almost always won critics choice and if they didn't they were in the top 5. The rest of the groups were average to below average and made up 90% of the company. By looking at the results you wouldn't know that though because of the 2-3 top groups.

The new studio is significantly smaller, 50 person company vs 150 person company, and every group does very well. Not a single one of DD's groups failed to place this year and only 1 group ever got lower than the highest adjudication. At Spotlight we won the sweepstakes award, 90% of our groups received a diamond which is all but 2 groups. Each competition the results were the same, all but 2 groups receiving the highest adjudication. 

In any business , it is difficult to go from small boutique to large power house. There are some mega studios that have it figured out but none in my area. 



It's funny because I think large means different things to different people.  I consider our studio large, but we have a 60 person company (which is 10 over what the SO originally wanted.)  When I think small, I think 15 person company or 50 students overall.  Our studio is like yours, and we often sweep awards so to me it feels like we are large.  I guess there are some much larger studios in our area, I just don't think of them as "bigger"...don't know why.  SO is opening up a 4th studio in our building this year...I bet this seems small to some, huh?


Our last studio has 4 studios plus a seperate location just for acro and large production rehearsals. It is also a gymnastics gym with a competition team so that adds to the 'being huge' part.

Current studio is about half the size and only has 3 studios. I guess it isn't tiny but I don't consider it large. 
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Oreogal

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Reply with quote  #27 
You ladies def. gave some helpful info!

How about studios that don't offer ballet at all? That seems to be a big trend in my area as well. From the huge mega winning studio I spoke about to DD's current small studio, ballet is only offerend to comp. students. Isn't ballet the foundation of all dance? I mean, can someone never take ballet class a day in their life, but become a great lyrical or contemporary dancer? I remember way back for the few years I took dance a 100 years ago, the studio made a HUGE deal that I needed to take ballet along with tap/jaz. Ballet was the reason I quit dance entirely bc I found it so damn tough and I was soo akward at it. Wish I didn't give up dance entirely though.

So why isn't ballet open to recreational dancers? Instead at mega studio, it's literally acro, hip-hop, acro and some more hip-hop. Literally, they have hip-hop classes for 2 years olds lol. Or hip hop combined with every other combo class.

The only thing that concerns me about DD's current studio isn't entirely the size. It's only been open 5 years, so I'm sure will grow eventually. ButSO seems to do little to no marketing to up enrollement either. They can't even be bothered to update schedules, etc on their website or list bios. But, it's the same thing. Ballet and technique classes only open to the comp. team. All the recreational classes are taught by previous students of SO (who is a very accomplished dancer/cheographer), but they are really young and do this as a side job.
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tendumom

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Reply with quote  #28 

A studio that doesn't offer ballet at all makes me cringe. You can tell when a dancer doing lyrical or contemporary does not have sufficient ballet. I would guess a studio that doesn't offer any ballet to non-company dancers doesn't care about those dancers and think they are only taking classes for fun, not to actually learn dance. It sounds like quite the money maker to me. 

Even the 2 hip hop focused studios in our general region both have ballet. One of those studios has large teams, large classes and has appeared on TV several times (America's Best Dance Crew, etc). The other is, like your dd's current studio, only about 5 years old. They do not compete but do attend conventions and do performances. The oldest dancers there are highly successful. Granted, most of those dancers came from another competition studio and took everything, but they still continue to take a ballet class or two or more each week. 

 

 

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Suzit42

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Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oreogal
You ladies def. gave some helpful info!

How about studios that don't offer ballet at all? That seems to be a big trend in my area as well. From the huge mega winning studio I spoke about to DD's current small studio, ballet is only offerend to comp. students. Isn't ballet the foundation of all dance? I mean, can someone never take ballet class a day in their life, but become a great lyrical or contemporary dancer? I remember way back for the few years I took dance a 100 years ago, the studio made a HUGE deal that I needed to take ballet along with tap/jaz. Ballet was the reason I quit dance entirely bc I found it so damn tough and I was soo akward at it. Wish I didn't give up dance entirely though.

So why isn't ballet open to recreational dancers? Instead at mega studio, it's literally acro, hip-hop, acro and some more hip-hop. Literally, they have hip-hop classes for 2 years olds lol. Or hip hop combined with every other combo class.

The only thing that concerns me about DD's current studio isn't entirely the size. It's only been open 5 years, so I'm sure will grow eventually. ButSO seems to do little to no marketing to up enrollement either. They can't even be bothered to update schedules, etc on their website or list bios. But, it's the same thing. Ballet and technique classes only open to the comp. team. All the recreational classes are taught by previous students of SO (who is a very accomplished dancer/cheographer), but they are really young and do this as a side job.


No ballet at all?? That is a huge red flag for me. Lots of rec kids become comp dancers. They need the ballet before they make the team. DD16 only gets two classes an hour and a half each week. I wish it were more. At our studio, ballet is by placement. Rec kids and comp kids are in the same class based on ability. Two of DDs comp teammates came from other studios last summer. They were placed in a lower class because they need to catch up. A few girls who did comp and are now rec, still take ballet classes and they are at the highest level.
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tappinmom

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Reply with quote  #30 
Any studio that doesn't offer ballet to all students is doing them a huge diservice.  I would run from a studio like that so fast my butt would be on fire.
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dave9988

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Reply with quote  #31 
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Originally Posted by Oreogal
And by better, I mean higher enrollment means they must be doing something right? Is a huge competition school that pride themself on being national champions


Anyone can be a "national champion," there have to be like 30 different tours that all have national championships, and some of them have multiples.  This isn't NCAA basketball.


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dave9988

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Reply with quote  #32 
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Originally Posted by tappinmom
Any studio that doesn't offer ballet to all students is doing them a huge diservice.  I would run from a studio like that so fast my butt would be on fire.


I agree with the sentiment regarding ballet.  FUNDAMENTALS, people.

Plus a thumbs up for that visual!!!!
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Daniella03

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Reply with quote  #33 
My daughter's studio is on the smaller size. They're going in to their fifth season, but they grow year after year. She's not the greatest at getting the website updated, but it does get done. I would say she's a dancer, teacher and choreographer before she's a businesswoman. we have the same classes available to comp kids as well as rec kids, comp kids just have extra classes for rehearsals. You must take ballet to compete in lyrical, contemporary tap or jazz. I would be running as far and as fast as I could from any program that didn't make ballet the back bone of their program.
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jeanne4379

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Reply with quote  #34 
I think you have to analyze why you are involved in dance.  Is it for a plastic trophy and accolades or to honor the dance form itself. And that honoring is in the classroom/studio learning and honing your craft.  I've won a few trophies in taekwondo - and they are in my bedroom closet, in the corner, on the floor.  If it's for a trophy then the art is meaningless.  
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Taptaptap

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Reply with quote  #35 
And, be careful of the "alumni" stats...my daughter's former studio is using her credentials in their advertising under "see where our former students are now!"  Nevermind she hasn't trained there in a while and we always took elsewhere for the genre in which she excels.
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tendumom

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Reply with quote  #36 

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And, be careful of the "alumni" stats...my daughter's former studio is using her credentials in their advertising under "see where our former students are now!"  Nevermind she hasn't trained there in a while and we always took elsewhere for the genre in which she excels.


So true!! 

There is a dancer from our general area who is claimed by no less than THREE ballet schools here! I gently teased her mom about how dd and I had noticed that each school claims her and she told me the real story. At one school, she mainly worked privately with the owner/teacher but also guested in their Nut etc. Actually, even now as a professional whose career is going very well, she still comes back to work with that teacher. The other two are schools she attended for a short period of time. Otherwise, her training came from SAB and JKO. She went to the local schools in between the two. The other two both claim her at times as if they were responsible for her training. 

 

 

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emcandance

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Reply with quote  #37 
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Originally Posted by melissa745
I do not think bigger is better. Smalls schools can be just as good. However, I think that the really good teachers want to make good money and I think that's probably easier for them to do at a larger school. That's just a guess, though. We go to the biggest school in town. I've hard a lot of snide comments from other folks in town about how our school pushes too sure and is too competitive. But when I see their kids dance, I know I'm in the right place.


I so agree with you.  We came from a small studio with the SO as the only teacher.  She didn't offer many classes so there were not a lot of opportunities for my DD.  SO had the studio and a FT job.
We moved to a large studio where we have 15+ teachers (I say + because SO is hiring this summer and I have no idea who she has hired).  There are so many more opportunities for my DD because there is huge money coming into the studio so she pays out for our girls.
For us, bigger is better, but I know that may not be the case for all.  What I can say is the money coming into a studio has a direct relation to what a studio can offer.
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NCKDAD

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Reply with quote  #38 
The big school in our area is a joke. They do the same choreo every year and compete down levels. They have dancers dancing YEARS longer than our girls still competing novice and junior, but the parents either don't care or aren't smart enough to understand.


People are afraid to leave the big studio because the owner threatens them if they do. The ones who have- have skyrocketed in ability, confidence and stage presence in just a year. But the reality is the attention and quality of instruction my kids receive at a smaller studio couldnt even be close to replicated at the large studio.
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heidi459

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Reply with quote  #39 
Quote:
Originally Posted by emcandance
Quote:
Originally Posted by melissa745
I do not think bigger is better. Smalls schools can be just as good. However, I think that the really good teachers want to make good money and I think that's probably easier for them to do at a larger school. That's just a guess, though. We go to the biggest school in town. I've hard a lot of snide comments from other folks in town about how our school pushes too sure and is too competitive. But when I see their kids dance, I know I'm in the right place.


I so agree with you.  We came from a small studio with the SO as the only teacher.  She didn't offer many classes so there were not a lot of opportunities for my DD.  SO had the studio and a FT job.
We moved to a large studio where we have 15+ teachers (I say + because SO is hiring this summer and I have no idea who she has hired).  There are so many more opportunities for my DD because there is huge money coming into the studio so she pays out for our girls.
For us, bigger is better, but I know that may not be the case for all.  What I can say is the money coming into a studio has a direct relation to what a studio can offer.


There are as many different scenarios as there are studios. A smaller studio may not have as much money to work w/but they also don't need as much.   Smaller studio = less overhead w/less space & less staff.  So it's very possible that they could offer a competitive compensation to the limited staff they have.   And then there are those really good teachers/choreos who choose the life of an independent contractor.  A couple of days here, a couple of days there... judge on weekends... choreo for different studios/independents... teach master classes.  That's an arrangement that is key for smaller studios & for a teacher who's an out of the box thinker? Where the "real" money is.  

I believe that amazing staff can be found at every size studio.  Imo it's more a matter of a dancer being able to catch the attention of that amazing staff so that they can truly benefit from their expertise.  Something that might be a little easier at a studio that is not too too large.  I used to think that it was all about what the dancer brought to class.... their talent, their work ethic, their attitude.  That that was pretty much all that was needed to become the best you could be.  My dd's new ballet studio has taught me otherwise.  

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ballerinamom13

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Reply with quote  #40 
How about studios that don't offer ballet at all?

Run as fast as you can, as far as you can, from any studio that doesn't offer ballet.  That's a joke.
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tendumom

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Reply with quote  #41 

How about studios that don't offer ballet at all?

Run as fast as you can, as far as you can, from any studio that doesn't offer ballet.  That's a joke


ITA!

Even the 2 big hip hop schools in our general region offer ballet! At the one I am most familiar with, the kids on the top crews ALL take ballet... and it shows. One of their members in on SYTYCD right now in the top 20. She's on Team Street but, so far, looks no different than those on Team Stage. 

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dirtchic

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Reply with quote  #42 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tendumom

How about studios that don't offer ballet at all?

Run as fast as you can, as far as you can, from any studio that doesn't offer ballet.  That's a joke


ITA!

Even the 2 big hip hop schools in our general region offer ballet! At the one I am most familiar with, the kids on the top crews ALL take ballet... and it shows. One of their members in on SYTYCD right now in the top 20. She's on Team Street but, so far, looks no different than those on Team Stage. 



DD's studio is big into hip hop. Slowly but surely SO is getting the hip hop students into other genres of dance, including ballet! 
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lauraberney

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Reply with quote  #43 

Dance studios cannot be judged by how many students they have registered or whether they are an award-winning company. It solely depends on how the dance teachers teach their students and how much efforts they put into getting it right.

On the whole, you should look out for a dance studio with experienced dance teachers, good infrastructure, and make sure it’s a place in which students can learn a lot to encourage their futures and aspirations.

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nicknoralove

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Reply with quote  #44 
It's so funny you're mentioning this.

The studio my daughter goes to has been around several decades. It's seen as more of an old school studio in our area and not one of the most popular. There is another studio in the area that is very well known for being a big time comp winning studio and lots of people gravitate towards it. It's also more modern looking and hasn't been around as long.

One evening I was floating around youtube watching comp dances and I pulled up a few videos of the big newer comp studio in our area. I have to say I was a bit surprised at the quality of the performances... not at all as great as I had expected. I then watched several of both our studio (recitals and comps) and another "old school" studio in our area, and it was apparent to me that both of the older studios who boast less about comp wins had much better technique and musicality to the routines.

There just wasn't much substance to the dances I saw from the big, popular comp studio.

It doesn't matter much to me, I am not a competitive person in that sense, I just love watching dance and it interests me, especially because some of my friends have tried to persuade me to leave our studio and follow them, which I have no desire to do.

Also the two old school studios do win several comps and have some great dancers, they just don't boast about it and use it as an advertising tool. Comps aren't their primary focus.
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