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DanceTumbleCheerMom

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DD11 was just diagnosed with a Wheat allergy  (in addition to Rye and all the other environmental stuff she is allergic too).   I have already discovered that not everything Glutan Free is Wheat free.   Anyone else deal wtih this, and would you be willing to share favorite recipes?

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diglass

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Myself and all 3 (1 dancer) kids have Celiac Disease. We are Gluten free (Wheat, Barley and Rye). I'm curious what you have found that says Gluten Free and still has wheat in it. Anything labeled Gluten free can not contain wheat according to the new FDA rules. There are products labeled wheat free that are not truly Gluten free. 

I would be more than happy to help answer any questions. As far as recipes, we typically eat lots of veggies and a protein. But I can share what flours we use etc.

Was your DD tested for Celiac disease as well? 
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melissa745

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Reply with quote  #3 
My son used to have a wheat allergy. I found it a lot easier to be wheat free than gluten free. As diglass mentioned, gluten free stuff doesn't have wheat and there are wheat free things that might have gluten.

Great example is oatmeal. My son would eat it all the time. Not all oatmeals are gluten free, but we didn't need to worry about that.

We used corn pasta, because it was tastier than rice pasta. And we just stopped giving him bread. Otherwise, it was pretty simple. And now there are even more wheat free options out there!
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DanceTumbleCheerMom

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Quote:
Originally Posted by diglass
Myself and all 3 (1 dancer) kids have Celiac Disease. We are Gluten free (Wheat, Barley and Rye). I'm curious what you have found that says Gluten Free and still has wheat in it. Anything labeled Gluten free can not contain wheat according to the new FDA rules. There are products labeled wheat free that are not truly Gluten free. 

I would be more than happy to help answer any questions. As far as recipes, we typically eat lots of veggies and a protein. But I can share what flours we use etc.

Was your DD tested for Celiac disease as well? 


She tested negative for celiacs last spring , they are retesting this week. In the stuff I got from the allergist included this

f a food is labeled gluten-free can it contain wheat protein?

A food can be labeled gluten free even if it includes certain ingredients (e.g., wheat starch) that may contain small amounts of wheat protein. Under the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, if an ingredient in a food product contains any amount of wheat protein, the word wheat must be included on the label, either in the ingredient list or Contains statement. However, a food may be labeled gluten free as long as it contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten


She has to be so careful that we carry an Epi pen.
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diglass

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Reply with quote  #5 
Wow, so sorry she is going through this. If your D has not been eating gluten/wheat she will test negative for Celiac disease, if they are using the blood test.  However that does not mean that she doesn't have CD. Your Dr could order a genetic test or do an endoscopy to determine if she has damage caused by Celiac. 

It sounds like you will have to avoid certain products even if they are labeled Gluten Free. 

Please let me know if you have any questions.
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3dancermommy

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I have one.  My advice for you is to cook everything.  I get my staples from Trader Joe's.  They have gluten free pasta, bread, and other items.  We eat a lot of rice.  Asian markets has many rice noodle variety too. But mostly keep it simple.  Meat, veggies, rice, fruit. 
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changole

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Reply with quote  #7 
I have a DS that has several severe food allergies, and he is celiac. In the beginning, focusing on veggies, fruits, and protein sources (chicken for dinner, almond butter and apple slices for snacks) was the simplest thing to do both time-wise and economically. 

I found through research the differences between GF/WF, and once you learn them, it isn't very tricky at all. What you ultimately learn though, that eating GF can be expensive if you buy processed, and time-consuming if you make everything yourself. Once I got out of the mindset of having to 'replace' family or familiar favorites with GF versions and to just enjoy the varieties of foods that are available, meal planning became much less stressful and worrisome.

I do recommend Gluten Free Girl blog and cookbooks. "Gluten-Free & Vegan Bread" by Jennifer Katzinger. Elizabeth Gordon has some cookbooks on dinners/snacks that are top 8 allergen friendly.

Through my own experimentation, I have come to really like a millet/almond flour (with tapioca/potato starch) combination for break and baked goods. Paleo recipes can work out well. 

Vitacost is a nice online source for GF products. That is where I get le veneziene noodles, which are my holy grail spaghetti noodles (I think I have tried them ALL)
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